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Full text of "Transactions of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society"

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OF THE 

MASSACHUSETTS 

HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

BOSTON 




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Charming spring wall garden by Alexander I. Heimlich 




Oliver Wolcott, right, awarding Alexander I. Heimlich the President's Cup 
for the spring wall garden at the 1959 Spring Flower Show 



6 



COMMITTEES OF THE SOCIETY 
For the Year Ending May 2, 1960 



OLIVER F. AMES 
STEDMAN BUTTRICK 



STEDMAN BUTTRICK 



OLIVER F. AMES 
STEDMAN BUTTRICK 



STEDMAN BUTTRICK 



ALLEN W. HIXON 



EDWARD DANE 
DR. JOHN R. HAVIS 



ALLEN W. HIXON 
JOHN HURLEY 



Executive Committee 
OLIVER WOLCOTT, Chairman 



EDWARD DANE 
WALTER HUNNEWELL 



Finance Committee 
OLIVER WOLCOTT, Chairman 

Budget Committee 

OLIVER WOLCOTT, Chairman 



EDWARD DANE 



EDWARD DANE 
WALTER HUNNEWELL 



HAROLD W. KNOWLTON 
CARTER LEE 



Committee on Building 
OLIVER WOLCOTT, Chairman 

HAROLD D. STEVENSON 

Membership Committee 

HAROLD W. KNOWLTON, Chairman 

HAROLD S. ROSS 

Committee on Exhibitions 
HAROLD D. STEVENSON, Chairman 

SETH L. KELSEY 

MRS. WILLIAM A. PARKER 

Committee on Prizes 
MILFORD LAWRENCE, Chairman 

HAROLD W. KNOWLTON 
JAMES SUTHERLAND 

Committee on Library 

ALBERT C. BURRAGE, Chairman 

MRS. EDWIN S. WEBSTER 
DR. DONALD WYMAN 



Committee on Lectures and Publications 
EDWARD DANE, Chairman 
STEDMAN BUTTRICK ERNEST HOFTYZER HAROLD S. ROSS 



Committee on Special Medals 
HAROLD S. ROSS, Chairman 



HAROLD W. KNOWLTON 
MILFORD LAWRENCE 



HAROLD D. STEVENSON 
MRS. ROGER S. WARNER 



Committee on Gardens 
DR. DONALD WYMAN, Chairman 



ALEXANDER I. HEIMLICH 
MISS HELEN C. MOSELEY 



MRS. WILLIAM A. PARKER 
A. W. SMITH 



Committee on Children's Gardens Exhibitions 

MRS. ROGER S. WARNER, Chairman 
MRS. HENRY D. TUDOR HENRY G. WENDLER 

Committee on the Albert C. Burrage Gold Vase 

ALBERT C. BURRAGE, Chairman 

MILFORD LAWRENCE MRS. WILLIAM A. PARKER 

MISS HELEN C. MOSELEY HAROLD D. STEVENSON 

Nominating Committee 

HAROLD W. KNOWLTON, Chairman 

MISS HELEN C. MOSELEY DR. DONALD WYMAN MRS. EDWIN S. WEBSTER 



Results of the Balloting at the Annual Meeting 

At 4:00 o'clock the polls were closed, 52 votes having been cast, and 
the following persons were declared elected: 

President: (for one year) Mr. Oliver Wolcott. 
Vice President: (for two years) Mr. Stedman Buttrick. 
Trustees: (for three years) Dr. John R. Havis, Mr. Milford Law- 
rence, Mr. Harold S. Ross, Mr. Harold D. Stevenson and Mrs. 
Roger S. Warner. 
Trustee: (for two years) Mr. Oliver F. Ames. 



Reports of Officers and Committees 

Presented at the Annual Meeting, May 4, 1959 

The Annual Meeting of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society was 
held at Horticultural Hall, Boston, on May 4, 1959 at 3 p.m., with the 
President, Mr. Oliver Wolcott, in the chair. He appointed as tellers Miss 
Elizabeth Munro and Miss Anne Sullivan. 

Mr. Arno H. Nehrling, the Executive Secretary, read the call for the 
meeting. By vote, the reading of the minutes of the previous Annual 
Meeting was waived. The following addresses and reports were read: 




Outstanding display of arrangements by Park Florist at the 1958 Harvest 

and Chrysanthemum Show 



The President's Address 

Probably the most marked feature of the year was the passing 
of Mechanics Building, which necessitated breaking a habit of 
long standing and holding our Spring Flower Show elsewhere. 
The exhibitors and the committee in charge did wonders in produc- 
ing such beautiful effects in a restricted space, but the severe crowd- 
ing of the spectators taught us that while Horticultural Hall was 
adequate for a flower show in the war years, it cannot cope with the 
crowds which the great increase of horticultural interest has pro- 
duced. 

Next year we are planning to hold our Spring Flower Show at 
Wonderland Park in Revere which has ample space, first class fa- 
cilities and an unlimited free parking area, as well as being adjacent 
to the MTA rapid transit. We are greatly indebted to the Wonderland 
Management for offering their facilities rent free and their public 
spirit is to be commended. 

Our various other shows during the year were well attended and 
contained many fine exhibits of horticultural skill. As usual we are 
indebted to the devoted staff of the Society and to the many trustees 
and others who contributed so much time and talent on our various 
committees. 

With the increase in our annual dues from $5 to $8, we have had 
a substantial falling off in membership, which we regret. We believe 
much of it was due to the business recession in 1958 and hope to 
recapture many old members and add new ones. 

The year was notable for the excellent financial showing of Horti- 
culture. While keeping its quality, its deficit was nearly eliminated, 
so that our budget was comfortably in balance. However, the foul 
weather which this Spring's Flower Show encountered resulted in a 
much lower profit than we had counted on and drastic efforts will 
have to be made to keep the present year's budget on an even keel. 

Finally, one of the highlights of the year, to me, was our making 
an exception of our usual practice of not pinning medals on each 
other, and awarding the Society's Gold Medal to our Secretary Arno 
H. Nehrling. His devoted service of twenty-six years, and the in- 
spiration he has given not only to the Society but to all flower lovers, 
were well worthy of this recognition. 

Oliver Wolcott 
President 



9 



Report of the Secretary 

It gives me pleasure to present my annual report, as Executive Secre- 
tary of the Society. We have had a busy year and one that presented 
many interesting problems. With the varied horticultural activities 
carried on in our building, our facilities are often taxed to capacity. I 
am thinking particularly of the specialized plant societies who call Hor- 
ticultural Hall their home. To the already long list of organizations was 
added this year the New England Aquarium Society, as well as a branch 
of the North American Lily Society. This interest is not surprising as 
horticulture is now the number one hobby in the country. 

When analyzing the various segments of the Society, the loss in mem- 
bers during the past year is a source of great concern to the officers and 
staff members. At the present time, we are carrying on a vigorous mem- 
bership campaign and I am pleased to inform you that the tide is now 
changing and new members are being added every day. The Membership 
Committee is constantly studying ways and means of obtaining new mem- 
bers. May I again urge all of you present to explain the advantages of 
membership to your friends and neighbors. 

The report on Horticulture is encouraging, especially from a finan- 
cial standpoint. It is gratifying to know that the deficit was very small 
compared to former years, in fact it almost reached the break-even point. 
Ever-increasing publication costs are our greatest concern. 

Our program for improving and modernizing the Library is almost 
complete. The addition of new stack shelving on the third floor is the final 
step in the work outlined by the Library Committee several years ago. We 
are proud of our Library and our efficient staff. I consider Miss Dorothy 
Manks the most capable horticultural librarian in the country. 

The courses in gardening, given under the direction of Mrs. Lucien 
B. Taylor, are more popular than ever. In fact the large enrollment made 
it necessary to add evening sessions, as well as advanced classes for 
pupils who had completed the courses for beginners. Both men and wom- 
en are eligible to enroll. 

Mrs. Arthur P. Teele, Director of the Associated Flower Arrangers of 
Massachusetts, again conducted a spring and fall series of lectures and 
demonstrations for members of the Society. This is her twentieth year 
and we owe her a debt of gratitude for the time and energy she devotes 
to this project. 

Other educational projects of the Society included the usual spring and 
\\ inter lecture series to which, according to a recent ruling, members may 
now bring one guest. The speakers came from many parts of the country 
and the lectures were well attended. Many members who attend these 
led i ires complain about the poor parking facilities in our neighborhood. 
It has been suggested that we conduct our lectures in adjoining towns 
and cities, where adequate parking facilities are available. This plan is 
Followed by the Audubon Society and a number of other organizations 
and seems to work out quite well. It deserves our consideration. 

10 



Report of the Secretary 

For our Spring Flower Show, we keenly felt the loss of Mechanics 
Building with its large areas and rambling halls. In spite of its age, it was 
one of the finest buildings for flower show purposes in the United States. 
As one wandered from one hall to another, the element of surprise was 
ever present. The modern auditorium does not offer these advantages. 

The experiment of holding the Spring Show in our own building, as 
well as in Symphony Hall, did not turn out according to our expectations. 
A good many of the exhibits were outstanding but when the halls were 
crowded the exhibits could not be seen. We owe our Show visitors an 
apology for this unfortunate situation and you may be sure we will not 
make the same mistake twice. As a result of these crowded conditions, 
five days as compared with six and one-half in former years, and a se- 
vere snowstorm, our financial returns were disappointing. 

After studying all the available buildings in which our Spring Show 
might be held, including the Commonwealth Armory, the Committee on 
Exhibitions recommended that the 1960 Spring Flower Show be held 
at Wonderland Park in Revere, Massachusetts. The available space in 
this establishment is very well suited for flower show purposes. Most im- 
portant, there are parking areas for 8,000 cars and no charge for parking. 

The nine specialized flower shows held during the year were well at- 
tended. The interest in the 1958 Hemerocallis Show, the newcomer on 
our schedule, was greater than ever. If the interest continues, it is sure to 
become an annual event. 

It is with regret that I must report that for reasons of health Mr. George 
Taloumis resigned as Editor of Horticulture. Instead of accepting his 
resignation, the Committee on Publications gave him an extended leave 
of absence. Mr. Taloumis was called back to handle the publicity for the 
recent Spring Flower Show and he performed an outstanding job. 

The new Editor of Horticulture is Mr. Phillip Clark, a graduate of 
the University of Minnesota, where he specialized in horticulture and 
journalism. His background includes newspaper and magazine work in 
many parts of the country, as well as in Mexico where for five years he 
served as Garden Editor of Mexico's English language daily. 

The interest in our annual field trip to the Arnold Arboretum is most 
gratifying. Each year we add a bus or two to the caravan and still we 
never seem to be able to take care of all our members. In no other way 
would we be able to visit the plant collections in different sections of the 
Arboretum in such a short period of time. At each stop Director Howard 
and Dr. Wyman and members of the Arboretum staff supply valuable 
information and answer questions. 

Garden visitations to those recognized by the Society the previous sea- 
son are being continued. A notice containing the names of the owners, 
as well as the locations of the gardens, will be mailed to all members 
at the proper time. 

11 



Report of the Secretary 

Under improvements to our physical plant I would like to report that 
the work of pointing the building was completed last fall. This work in- 
cluded the repair of drains which were not functioning properly. As far 
as we know, the building is now absolutely water tight. 

For the Spring Flower Show, as well as rentals and future exhibitions, 
we found it necessary to install a new Edison line, as well as a new switch 
to take care of the additional voltage. The cost of this work was over a 
thousand dollars, which can be charged to improvements to the building 
over a period of years. Painting of the interior of the building, which we 
planned to do with profits from the Spring Show, will be deferred for 
another year. 

It now becomes my sad duty to report the death of Mr. Aubrey Butler 
of Northampton, a former Vice-President and Trustee of this Society since 
1942. Mr. Butler was especially interested in our flower shows. The 
wonderful rose and camellia exhibits staged under his direction will long 
be remembered. 

In closing may I thank the Officers and Trustees, as well as the Chair- 
men of the various committees, for their wonderful cooperation. I would 
also like to extend my sincerest thanks to the members of the staff for 
their continued loyalty and interest in the work of the Society. 



Respectfully submitted, 



Arno H. Nehrling 
Executive Secretary 




Attractive display of camellia arrangements by Butler and Ullman at the 

1959 Spring Flower Show 



12 



Report of the Committee on Exhibitions 

a fter serving on the Exhibition Committee for the last twelve years 
/-\ under the leadership of such able men as Dr. Elmer D. Merrill, 
^TjX. Mr. George W. Butterworth and Mr. Seth L. Kelsey, I felt indeed 
it was a great honor to be elected its Chairman. Beyond that, I realized 
it was a great challenge, to emulate the excellent record achieved by 
these men during the last ten or fifteen years. I trust that the results of 
this year's Spring Flower Show will not be taken as a criterion of my 
ability. The Committee was naturally disappointed in the 50% reduction 
in attendance, and the even greater drop in the financial remuneration. 
We were fortunate though to make a profit. Some of the factors that reflect 
the loss in attendance are as follows: 1. The Show ran one day less in its 
time limit. 2. It could not open on a Sunday, as in previous years. 3. Only 
one and one-half days were available to install exhibits in Symphony Hall. 
4. A severe snowstorm cut attendance for that particular day to 2,600 
people. May I say here though, that there were many creditable exhibits 
in this year's Show. Special commendation should be given to Weston 
Nurseries Inc. for their tremendous effort in staging the large exhibit in 
Symphony Hall and doing it so well in twenty-four hours. 

Both the Women's Exhibitions Committee and the Garden Club Fed- 
eration of Massachusetts worked under tremendous handicaps this year, 
because of limited space. We hope next year to make amends in that 
respect. 

We do feel now that with the new location for the 1960 Spring Flower 
Show at Wonderland Park, both the attendance and the financial status 
will increase considerably, in fact, we hope it will surpass anything real- 
ized before. Everything points to a banner year in 1960, with the in- 
creased exhibition space and snack bar and terraced eating area all under 
one roof, as well as extensive facilities for parking and easy access from 
all points. You may rest assured that the Exhibition Committee will do 
everything in its power to make next year's Flower Show an outstanding 
success. A great deal of credit goes to Mr. Seth L. Kelsey for his effort 
in contacting the right parties to have this rent-free site available for our 
Show. 

The Exhibition Committee held twelve meetings last year. Ten shows 
were held in all, of which only two were paid shows. The Daffodil Show 
had an attendance of 1,417, with a decrease of 173 from the previous 
year. The Tulip Show increased 1,037 over last year for a total of 2,384. 
The Iris Show also increased by 228 for a total of 2,100. The Rose Show 
gained 586 in attendance for a total of 2,372. The Hemerocallis Show 
with 705 and the Gladiolus Show of 1,435, were as the year before. The 
Harvest and Chrysanthemum Show dropped 805 for a total attendance 
of 5,693. The Spring Show attendance was 57,095 with a decrease of 
46,378 from that of 1958. 

The flower shows are planned and executed by many different types 
of people. There are differences and discussions, even disputes, but as a 

13 



Report of the Committee on Exhibitions 

whole, they are a grand lot of people, and all have a common love for 
plants. It is on these people that we rely to make our flower shows a suc- 
cess. The Committee wishes to thank all who participated in last year's 
exhibitions. We also wish to thank the staff at Horticultural Hall for their 
efficient help in smoothing out difficulties. Last but not least, we wish to 
thank the Director of Exhibitions, Mr. Arno H. Nehrling, for his ceaseless 
effort to cope with problems, to arbitrate disputes and to be all over the 
premises to see that loose ends are put in place. I know this from experi- 
ence, because we practically locked the doors together the last two nights 
before this Spring Show opened. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Harold D. Stevenson, Chairman 
Committee on Exhibitions 

Report of the Library Committee for 1958 

A report on the work of the Library is first of all a report on its use 
by members and the gardening public. On a typical day there 
^ will be telephone requests and personal calls, from local mem- 
bers of course. The mail may come from Florida, Kentucky, California, 
New York State, or Maine, and bring requests from a professional writer 
working on a new book, a landscape architect, the owner of a new home, 
the agricultural library of the State University, and the organizing com- 
mittee of a new garden club. 

During the past year, 4,833 books were loaned. The most popular sub- 
jects have been home garden design, flower arrangement, small greenhouse 
management and house plants. There is a growing interest in rock gardens. 

To meet these varied calls, the Library added 319 new books and 175 
bound magazines, making the total of the collections 31,842 volumes. We 
try to get all the current American publications and the best of those 
from abroad. We receive more than 300 magazines, and the bulletins of 
the United States Department of Agriculture and the state agricultural 
departments and experiment stations. The file of nursery catalogues rep- 
resents all parts of the country and many specialists of the trade. 

Several exhibits have been arranged during the year, some of them in 
collaboration with the Herb Society of America, the Gourd Society, the 
New England Rose Society and the New England Iris Society. For the 
annual meeting of the Garden Club of America, we were asked to send 
an exhibit from our collection of fine prints. These prints were on display 
during the summer in the Museum at York, Maine. It would give us 
pleasure to share our show cases with other groups. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Albert C. Burrage, Chairman 
Committee on the Library 

14 



Report of the Committee on Children's Gardens 

a ccording to the United States Weather Bureau at Boston, the year 
Z-\ 1958 was the wettest on record. The year ended with an excess 
A- -A. of more than 24 inches of rainfall. As of May 1, 1958, the rainfall 
in the Boston area totaled 28 inches— 14 inches above normal, for the 
first four months. Coupled with the heavy rainfall was much very cool, 
cloudy weather, making the growing season about three weeks late. Ex- 
cessive rain and low temperatures continued right through the season. 
Lack of sunlight and the usual summer heat delayed crop maturity right 
through the season. This unusually cold, wet, late season had some effect 
on certain classes at the Children's Show. Ripe tomato classes totaled 
thirty entries while in 1957 the same classes had over 100 entries. The 
pumpkin class had one entry and there were no mature butternut squash 
on display at all. On the other hand, the summer squash class had 105 
entries, green tomatoes 116, snap beans 91 and beets 82. 

In spite of the most adverse weather conditions during the entire grow- 
ing season, the children labored diligently and kept ahead of the worst 
crop of weeds in many a year. The final count at the Exhibition of the 
Products of the Children's Gardens was 1401 entries, an increase of 137 
over the previous year. As in 1957, the flower classes were set up in the 
main hall to give the show added color and remove the flatness common 
with numerous table exhibits. 

The outstanding exhibit from the Boston Public School Garden at the 
Cummings Estate in Woburn was most unusual. Staged by the children, 
under the supervision of Miss Catherine M. Maney and her assistants, this 
exhibit was awarded First Prize, the Society's Gold Medal and a Cultural 
Certificate. This is the sixth successive year that this garden has received 
a Gold Medal at this show and the second time a Cultural Certificate was 
ever awarded at a Children's Show. A Cultural Certificate is awarded 
only to an exhibit showing unusual cultural skill. The Massachusetts De- 
partment of Agriculture recognized the excellent qualities of the exhibit 
and awarded it a special rosette ribbon. 

A superb two hundred square foot display, containing many varieties 
of vegetables, was staged in the main hall at the Annual Harvest and 
Chrysanthemum Show by the children and staff of the Boston School 
Garden at Woburn. Authorities agreed that this display ranked with the 
best displays shown at the great shows held in Sutton, England. The 
quality of the exhibit is evidenced by the awards given it— a First Prize, 
a Gold Medal and a Cultural Certificate for the fifth successive year in 
adult competition. 

The children also staged a fifty square foot Gourd Exhibit, winnning 
First Prize and a fifty square foot Educational Squash and Pumpkin Ex- 
hibit, awarded a Special Prize. Thirty-five prizes were won in the vege- 
table plate entries at the same show. 

Students from the Jamaica Plain High School Agricultural Department 
and the Norfolk County Agricultural School, under the guidance of their 

15 



Report of Committee on Chidren's Gardens 

instructors, staged excellent exhibits at the 1958 New England Spring 
Flower Show held at Mechanics Building. The Norfolk County School 
exhibit was awarded a Bronze Medal and the Jamaica Plain High School 
exhibit a Silver Medal. Here again Juniors were participating in the great- 
est adult show of the region. 

The 4-H Club exhibit at the Children's Show had the usual fine quality 
and showed a marked increase in numbers of entries over 1957. This was 
due to the more favorable growing conditions in the southeastern part of 
the State where the bulk of the 4-H exhibits are grown. 

Although 1958 was one of the wettest years on record, exhibition- 
wise, it was a banner year for the young people of the Commonwealth 
interested in horticulture, thanks to the Massachusetts Horticultural So- 
ciety, its staff, the many garden teachers, supervisors and 4-H leaders. 

Henry G. Wendler 

for the 
Committee on Children's Gardens 



Report of the Committee on Prizes 

Ont behalf of the Committee on Prizes we again respectfully submit 
our annual report of this Committee's activities during the past 
year. 

The ten shows T conducted by the Massachusetts Horticultural Society 
in 1958 well maintained the high standards of exhibitions for which this 
Society is noted throughout the country. Good judging is essential and 
we believe has been capably provided by the large number of competent 
men and women invited by the Prize Committee to serve. Their generous 
cooperation and help is gratefully acknowledged. 

We request all members of the Society to suggest to the Executive 
Secretary additional persons known to them whose skill and interest would 
qualify them to serve as judges at future shows, believing that the wider 
the field of choice is, the greater the interest in the shows will be. Thus, 
too, the Society and the membership will derive pleasure and benefit 
from the new talent and enthusiasm in the work of the Society. 

As we reported last year, the policy of the Committee on Prizes has 
been to try to increase the esteem in which bronze and silver medals of the 
Society are held, and thereby enhance still further the exceptional tribute 
conveyed by the gold medal. There has been some evidence of approval 
of this policy from both members and exhibitors. 

Somewhat hesitantly, we should like to offer for thoughtful considera- 
tion the idea that the admiring public, the exhibitors and the judges might 
benefit, if those exhibits which are intended to present a certain distinction 

16 



Report of Committee on Prizes 

of type, or symbolism, or special appeal, could be so described on a simple 
card to be posted with each such exhibit. The purpose would be to con- 
vey to the beholder in a few well chosen words what he should endeavor 
to see and feel in that particular exhibit, and thus to stimulate keener ap- 
preciation of what is being attempted. If this could be done in a dignified 
unobtrusive manner, could it not improve educational values and at the 
same time helpfully guide the judges in their interpretation of the effect 
created? 

A second suggestion concerns the possibility of unique exhibits embody- 
ing special effects,— it may be, for example, of historic significance, or of 
exotic or religious symbolism perhaps. In such cases the appointment of 
special judges specifically qualified to evaluate those particular factors 
might be thought desirable. It then would seem wise to inform prospective 
exhibitors well in advance of the show, that they may request the ap- 
pointment of such judges, if deemed wise by the Society. 

The death of Thomas Milne, for many years a most capable co-chairman 
of the Committee on Prizes has been kneely felt by his associates and the 
multitude of friends who knew him and respected him. 

The appointment of Mr. James Sutherland as a member of this Com- 
mittee is particularly gratifying to all. 

All of us on the Committee,' Mr. Harold W. Knowlton, Mr. John Hurley, 
Mr. Allen W. Hixon, Mr. James Sutherland and the undersigned are, as 
always, very grateful for the privilege of serving in this capacity, and 
fully appreciative of the splendid service and cooperation of the officers, 
trustees and committees of the Society, and especially of the Executive 
Secretary Mr. Nehrling, and his efficient staff. 

Milford R. Lawrence, Chairman 
Committee on Prizes 










17 



Special Medal Awards 



The George Robert White 
Medal of Honor 

To Conrad L. Wirth, Wash- 
ington, D. C, distinguished son 
of a distinguished horticulturist; 
present Director of the National 
Park Service of the United 
States; holder of the rare hon- 
orary degree of Doctor of Land- 
scape Architecture from his alma 
mater the University of Massa- 
chusetts; and inspiring leader ir 
the great task of helping to pre- 
serve the magnificent heritage of 
natural beauty and historic sig- 
nificance of some twenty-four 
million acres of the National Park 
System throughout the United 
States and its possessions. 




Conrad L. Wirth 




Aubrey B. Butler 



The Thomas Roland Medal 

To the late Aubrey B. Butler, 
Northampton, Massachusetts, for 
exceptional skill in horticulture. 
Possessed of an inherent love for 
flowers, after graduating from 
college, he decided to make 
commercial floriculture his life's 
work. As a grower, wholesaler 
and retailer, he has ever been 
extremely progressive and alert, 
always in the forefront, experi- 
menting with new greenhouse 
equipment, new methods and 
new ideas. His service to the 
Massachusetts Horticultural So- 
ciety over a period of many years 
has been conspicuously unselfish. 
Furthermore, he has been a con- 
sistent exhibitor in our flower 
shows over a long period of time. 



18 



Special Medal Awards 



The Jackson Dawson 
Medal 

To Professor Lewis Charles 
Chadwick of Ohio State Univer- 
sity and Ohio Agricultural Ex- 
periment Station, for his con- 
spicuous contributions to the sci- 
ence and practice of plant propa- 
gation and for effective work in 
numerous other horticultural 
fields, including the authorship 
of many books and other valua- 
ble writings. 




Prof. Lewis C. Chadwick 




The Albert C. Burrage 
Gold Vase 

The Albert C. Burrage Gold 
Vase, America's most coveted 
flower show trophy, was pre- 
sented to Mr. Harold D. Steven- 
son, Rockland, Massachusetts, 
by the Masachusetts Horticul- 
tural Society. This outstanding 
award was presented to Mr. 
Stevenson for creating the out- 
standing Mission Garden exhibit 
of the Massachusetts Horticul- 
tural Society on the stage at the 
1958 Spring Flower Show. 



Harold D. Stevenson 



19 



Special Medal Awards 

The Society's Large Gold Medal 

To Mrs. Susan Delano McKelvey, Boston, Massachusetts, in recogni- 
tion of her scholarly writings and the vast amount of research that repre- 
sents the background of her remarkable books,— "The Lilac", "Yuccas of 
the Southwestern United States" and "Botanical Exploration of the Trans- 
Mississippi West 1790-1850". 



The Society's Large Gold Medal 

To Arno H. Nehrling, Needham, Massachusetts, in recognition of the 
twenty-five years of experienced guidance that he has given this Society's 
many and diverse interests, but nevertheless with especial emphasis on the 
able management that he has given to our Flower Shows. Due to his rare 
showmanship, they have stood in the forefront of all Flower Shows staged 
through the length and breadth of the United States. 




Mr. Arno H. Nehrling, Secretary of the Massachusetts Horticultural So- 
ciety receiving the Society's Large Gold Medal from Harold S. Ross 



20 




Mrs. Edwin S. Webster, left, presenting the Bulkley Medal of the Garden 

Club of America to Marinus Vander Pol for the Japanese Garden exhibit 

at the 1959 Spring Flower Show 



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21 



Garden Committee Awards 

The Board of Trustees awarded the following medals on the recommen- 
dation of the Committee on Gardens, Dr. Donald Wyman, Chairman. 

The H. H, Hunnewell Medal 

To Mr. and Mrs. John Bullard, Nonquit. Rare plants very well main- 
tained, beautiful gardens well kept, and a view of the ocean unmolested 
by plantings, were all integral parts of this excellent and extensive gar- 
den. A shade garden of primroses with one white azalea standing guard 
over all; a sweep of laurel ending the terrace; espaliered fruits, woods 
plantings, and a tremendous Chinese wisteria and white Japanese wisteria 
combination together with an espaliered tamarisk, featured on the house— 
these were the work of planning with horticultural knowledge and great 
taste. 

The Albert C. Burrage Porch Prize 

To Mr. and Mrs. Donald Kirk David, Osterville. An ingeniously de- 
signed, enclosed porch, facing the garden of Mrs. David on one side, of 
Mr. David on the other, and the open sea on the third. The porch has 
been so enclosed with glass that it seems difficult to determine where gar- 
den ends and porch begins. Tastefully planted with careful respect for 
continuing color, the very well-kept gardens are an ever-interesting and 
ever-changing series of pictures to anyone viewing them from the porch. 

The Society's Gold Medal 

The Children's Medical Center, Boston. A beautifully-conceived and 
well-executed court garden. Completely surrounded by brick walls, this is 
a restful and intimately interesting, ever-changing place for the young 
children who are wheeled about or walk about the asphalt paths. The 
standard geraniums, espaliered wall shrubs, beautiful bulbs and ground 
covers as well as its ever-busy fountain and rustling trees, can easily serve 
as a visual promise to youngsters that Nature has not forgotten them dur- 
ing their period of confinement. 

Mr. Karl Hoblitzelle, Cotuit. Attractively designed with a clever use of 
space and a good feeling of maturity, this large seaside estate is dominated 
by a long winding entrance drive and a very large entrance court where 
the owner's demand for extensive parking was cleverly handled, providing 
the space without making it look like an extensive desert. With plenty of 
space available, many of the better rare shrubs and trees have been tried 
with excellent results. In a swale at one side, trees, shrubs, and flowers 
and an irregular pool form a garden of color and charm. The silk tree, 
sourwood, Japanese dogwood, Siebold viburnum, enkianthus, and many 
another interesting plant all have been studiously placed to give the best 
protection and growth results possible. All in all, these have been com- 
bined to produce an extremely well-knit and beautiful property. 



22 




Garden of Mr. and Mrs. John Morgan Bullard, Nonquit 
Awarded the H. H. Hunnewell Medal 




Garden of Mr. and Mrs. Donald Kirk David, Osterville 
Awarded the Albert C. Bun age Porch Prize 



23 




Mrs. Donald P. Tulloch accepting the Gold Medal awarded to St. Mary's 
Episcopal Church from Dr. Donald Wyman 




St. Mary's Episcopal Church Garden, Barnstable 



24 



Garden Committee Awards 

The Society s Gold Medal 

St. Mary's Episcopal Church, Barnstable. Conceived and mainly exe- 
cuted by the rector, Rev. Robert Nicholson, the garden of St. Mary's 
Church is a striking example of appropriate yet highly-imaginative treat- 
ment. Here is a series of small gardens— several are memorials. Though 
closely connected by shaded walks, each is a place apart of quietness and 
solitude for thought and meditation. Native material has been retained 
with artistry, while man-made features— a bridge over the brook, a shrine, 
the patterned brick walks— blend unobtrusively into the whole design. 

The Society's Silver Medal 

Mr. and Mrs. Dewey D. Stone, Brockton. A highly-successful urban 
garden, dignified and not too crowded, creating an impression of space 
and privacy together with a pleasantiy restful quality. The whole is car- 
ried out with taste and imagination. 

Mrs. Mary C. Draper, Woods Hole. Within a few feet of the sea and 
with water on three sides, this property has suffered the ravages of three 
hurricanes. Between the house and the ocean is a sunken garden bright 
with flowers; while towards the Point, a distinctive clump of Japanese 
black pine bears witness that these indomitable trees can exist with both 
wind and sea, as can excellent Japanese yews of several varieties. The 
triumph of this garden is the way site difficulties have been overcome 
without visible effort. 

Coonamessett Inn, Inc., Falmouth. A very evident love of plants has 
resulted in accomplishing a creditable, three-way landscape project— the 
beautiful planting of Inn and shops, the enriching of the home grounds of 
the owners nearby with tasteful and most effective plantings, and the 
planting of annuals in a nearby traffic circle to brighten the entire area. 
Situated overlooking the nearby lake, the Inn buildings are tastefully 
planted and well cared for, even unto a splendid perennial border in the 
customary median parking strip. The home plantings reflect the more per- 
sonal tastes of the owners, but are open to public view; these and the Inn 
cutting garden nearby combine to make a colorful spot for all visitors. 

Mr. Cyril H. Jones, Cotuit. A garden of great charm, well kept, with 
good material. Masses of heather, Japanese spurge, rock cotoneaster, and 
other ground covers are outstanding; as also are a bay-front view across 
Nantucket Sound and winding paths which urge one around the garden 
and among the clipped hedges. Excellent groupings of typically seaside 
plants such as Clethra alnifolia and inkberry are featured parts of this 
most effective garden. 

Mr. and Mrs. Pemberton Whitcomb, Cotuit. A great sweep of well-kept 
lawn rolls down to the ocean on this beautiful estate. From the house one 
looks down upon a colorful walled garden and across it, with obstructing 
trees, to a magnificent view of white sand, sky, and water. These carefully- 
tended plantings and their surroundings depict Cape Cod at its best. 

25 




Garden of Mr. Karl Hoblitzelle, Cotuit 
Awarded a Gold Medal 




Court Garden of Children's Medical Center, Boston 
Awarded a Gold Medal 



26 



Garden Committee Awards 

The Society's Silver Medal 
Mrs. Stuart M. Crocker, Chatham. A typical, old-fashioned dooryard 
garden, surrounding the door of one of the oldest seaside houses in this 
area. Only 40 feet long by about 15 feet wide, enclosed by a low but 
tight, white picket fence to protect the plants from ocean winds, this de- 
lightful garden is brim full of profusely-flowering annuals and perennials— 
a superb example of a type associated with the old-fashioned Cape Cod 
house. 

The Society's Bronze Medal 

Mrs. Mark Duff, New Bedford. A charming old garden, hidden from 
New Bedford's busiest street by high, close plantings; the boxwood plant 
garden, the rose garden, the vegetable garden— all show the influence of 
plans and plantings in the baroque style of seventy-five years ago. 

Dr. and Mrs. Edward B. Robertson, Nonquit. A small, intimate garden, 
shielded from the sea winds by junipers and pines, closely packed with 
many an interesting horticultural specimen, reflecting the interest and 
knowledgeable care of the owners. 

Mrs. G. H. A. Clowes, Woods Hole. An interesting garden shaped in 
the general design of a huge scallop shell, with walks emanating from a 
central point at the main entrance and widening out towards the peri- 
meter. Completely closed from the ocean winds by tall shrubs, the helio- 
trope, tall dahlias, lilies, annuals, and even a few vegetables, go to make 
this a garden of unique design and interest. 

Mrs. Marion C. Blossom, Cotuit. A small but very livable garden, with 
plants all in scale, featuring a century-old red cedar on the sea side of the 
house. Rhododendrons, pines, laurel, and cotoneasters aid in making this 
shaded and simply-planted garden a most restful one. 

The Societtfs Garden Certificate 

Mr. and Mrs. G. L. Rowsey, Hatchville. Overlooking Coonamessett 
Lake, the long entrance drive with its well-kept shrubs and good use of 
single pines is most impressive. Well-trimmed box, not too formally 
sheared, and well-placed arborvitae specimens both aid in making the 
foundation planting effective. A rose garden, vegetable and cutting gar- 
den, as well as a greenhouse, all attest the owner's interest in plants. 

Mr. and Mrs. Richardson Wright, Chatham. A small, brick-walled, sea- 
side garden, completely protected from the ocean's winds by planting and 
wall, with a raised bed two feet off the ground designed for easy tending. 
Tastefully shaded with honeylocust, Katsura tree, and hawthorn, with 
espaliered crab apples against the rear wall, well-placed figures partially 
concealed on top and small jars at base, it shows the taste and indomitable 
love of gardening of an outstanding veteran in horticulture. 



27 



Garden Committee Awards 




Planting at Coonamessett Inn, Inc., Falmouth 
Awarded a Silver Medal 




Garden of Mr. and Mrs. Dewey Stone, Brockton 
Awarded a Silver Medal 



28 



Garden Committee Awards 




Garden of Mrs. Mary C. Draper, Woods Hole 
Awarded a Silver Medal 




Garden of Mr. and Mrs. Pemberton Whitcomb, 
Awarded a Silver Medal 



Cotuit 



29 



Medals and Certificates Awarded in 1958 

The Albert C. Burrage Gold Vase 

Mr. Harold D. Stevenson, Rockland, for the California mission garden, 
the most outstanding exhibit in 1958. 

George Robert White Medal of Honor 

Mr. Conrad L. Wirth, Washington, D. C, for eminent service in horti- 
culture. 

Thomas Roland Medal 

Mr. Aubrey B. Butler, Northampton, for exceptional skill in horticulture. 

Jackson Dawson Medal 

Professor Lewis Charles Chadwick, Columbus, Ohio, for his contributions 
to the science and practice of plant propagation. 

Gold Medals of the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

Children's Medical Center, Boston, for a well executed court garden. 
Mr. Karl Hoblitzelle, Cotuit, for a large seaside estate appropriately 
planned and planted. 

Mrs. Susan Delano McKelvey, Boston, in recognition of her scholarly 

writings. 
Mr. Arno H. Nehrling, Needham, in recognition of the twenty-five years 

of guidance he has given the Society's diverse interests. 
St. Mary's Episcopal Church, Barnstable, for a series of appropriate but 

small memorial gardens. 

Silver Medals of the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

Coonamessett Inn, Inc., Falmouth, for a series of ornamental plantings 
which greatly enhance a commercial establishment. 

Mrs. Stuart M. Crocker, Chatham, for an old-fashioned Cape Cod door- 
yard garden. 

Mrs. Mary C. Draper, Woods Hole, for a garden surrounded on three 
sides by the sea. 

Mr. Cyril H. Jones, Cotuit, for a large seaside garden where ground 
covers have been used to advantage. 

30 



Silver Medals of the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

Mr. and Mrs. Dewey Stone, Brockton, for successful urban garden. 
Mr. and Mrs. Pemberton Whitcomb, Cotuit, for a seaside garden showing 
a Cape Cod landscape at its best. 

Bronze Medals of the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

Mrs. M. C. Blossom, Cotuit, for a small but livable seashore garden. 

Mrs. G. H. A. Clowes, Woods Hole, for a seashore garden in the form of 

a huge scallop shell. 
Mrs. Mark Duff, New Bedford, for a charming old garden showing the 

influence of plans and plantings of 75 years ago. 
Dr. and Mrs. Edward B. Robertson, Nonquit, for a small but intimate 

seashore garden. 

I Garden Certificates of the 

I Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

y Mr. and Mrs. G. L. Rowsey, Hatchville, for a series of gardens well knit 
together. 

Mr. and Mrs. Richardson Wright, Chatham, for a shaded seaside garden 
with raised beds. 

H. H. Hunnewell Medal 

Mr. and Mrs. John Bullard, Nonquit, for a series of large, well kept 
gardens planted with rare materials. 

The Albert C. Burrage Porch Prize 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald Kirk David, Osterville, for an ingeniously designed 
porch, facing gardens on two sides and the open sea on the third. 

The President's Cup 

Massachusetts Horticultural Society, for a California mission garden, the 
most meritorious exhibit in the Spring Show. 

Gold Medal of the 
Horticultural Society of New York 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Stone, Marion, for an informal exhibit of acacias, 
the most beautiful exhibit in the Spring Show. 

31 



Medals and Certificates 

Gold Medal Certificate of the 
Pennsylvania Horticultural Society 

M annus Vander Pol, Fairhaven, for an exhibit of special merit which 
stimulates an interest in horticulture in the Spring Show. 

Beacon Hill Garden Club Cup 

Charles River Valley Garden Club, for an herb garden, the most charming 
garden club exhibit in the Spring Show. 

Mrs. John S. Ames Cup 

Cohasset Garden Club, for the exhibit in the Garden Club Section display- 
ing the greatest horticultural excellence at the Spring Show. 

The Antoine Leuthy Prize 

Wellesley College, Botany Department, for an educational exhibit at the 
Spring Show. 

Trophy of the 
Massachusetts Department of Agriculture 

Butler & Ullman, Inc., Northampton, for a display of roses at the Spring 
Show. 



Bulkley Medal of the Garden Club of America 

Women's Exhibitions Committee (Miss Anne H. Richards, Chairman) for 
"A Gallery of Gardens" at the Spring Show. 

The Beatrix Farrand Silver Bowl 

Arnold Arboretum, Jamaica Plain, for a section of a hobbyist's rhododen- 
dron garden at the Spring Show. 

Best Blooms 

Camellia Lotus, exhibited by Bruno Tosi, Manchester. 

Daffodil Her Majesty, exhibited by Breck's, Boston. 

Hemerocallis Lochinvar, by Mr. & Mrs. Stedman Buttrick, Concord. 

Iris Truly Yours, exhibited by Mrs. Irving W. Fraim, Waltham. 

Tulip Northern Queen, by The First Church of Christ, Scientist, Boston. 

32 



Medals and Certificates 

Gold Medals 

Arthur Arenius, for a display of gladiolus. 

Arnold Arboretum, for a section of a hobbyist's rhododendron garden 
at the Spring Show. 

Associated Fruit Growers of Eastern Massachusetts, for an educational 
exhibit of fruit. 

Boston Market Gardeners' Ass., for a roadside stand and vegetable exhibit. 

Boston Public School Garden at Woburn, for a display of vegetables. 

Boston Public School Garden at Woburn, for a display of vegetables and 
flowers. 

Breck's, for a display of daffodils. 

Butler & Ullman, Inc., for a display of camellias. 

Butler & Ullman, Inc., for a display of roses at the Spring Show. 

Cider Hill Greenhouses, York, Maine, for a group of saintpaulias at the 
Spring Show. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Dane, for a group of odontoglossums at the Spring 
Show. 

Flower Arrangement Section (Mrs. Percy I. Merry, Chairman), for a 
group of flower arrangements. 

Garden Club Federation of Massachusetts (Mrs. Ransom Rowe, Chair- 
man), for a group of flower arrangements based on the theme "Ver- 
mont Life" at the Spring Show. 

Gardner Museum, for a group of amaryllis at the Spring Show. 

Alexander I. Heimlich, for a chrysanthemum garden. 

Huntington Valley Garden Club (at Philadelphia), for a section of a gar- 
den to attract birds at the Spring Show. 

Arthur Leiby's Nursery, for an informal garden at the Spring Show. 

Lexington Gardens, Inc., for a mission garden at the Spring Show. 

Massachusetts Department of Natural Resources, for a typical scene 
within our state parks at the Spring Show. 

Massachusetts Horticultural Society, for a California mission garden at 
the Spring Show. 

New England Carnation Growers' Association, for Carnation Hall at the 
Spring Show. 

North Shore Horticultural Society, for a formal garden at the Spring 
Show. 

Old Colony Landscape Service Co., for a patio garden at the Spring Show. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Stone, for an informal exhibit of acacias at the 
Spring Show. 

33 



Medals and Certificates 

Gold Medals 

Marinus Vander Pol, for an informal garden at the Spring Show. 
Wayside Gardens Co., Mentor, Ohio, for a display of tulips. 
Mrs. Edwin S. Webster, for a group of orchids at the Spring Show. 
Wellesley College Botany Department, for an educational exhibit at the 

Spring Show. 
Women's Exhibitions Committee (Miss Anne H. Richards, Chairman), foi 

"A Gallery of Gardens" at the Spring Show. 

Silver Medals 

American Begonia Society, New England Branch, for a mission patio gar- 
den at the Spring Show. 

American Iris Society, for a display of iris. 

Arnold Arboretum, for a display of berried trees and shrubs. 

Bartlett Gardens, for a chrysanthemum garden. 

Bay State Nurseries, for an informal planting suitable for a home on the 
New England coast at the Spring Show. 

Sandy Best, Ontario, Canada (at Toronto) , for lily Viking. 

Boston Aquarium Society, for an educational aquarium exhibit at the 
Spring Show. 

Breck's, for a display of tulips. 

F. I. Carter & Sons, for an informal garden of cacti and succulents at the 
Spring Show. 

James R. Cass, for a display of climbing roses. 

Cherry Hill Nurseries, for an informal planting at the Spring Show. 

P. dejager & Sons, Inc., for a collection of tulips. 

Garden Craft, for a display of dried material. 

Gardeners' and Florists' Club, Boston, for a spring garden at Spring Show. 

Mrs. Daniel Huger (at Manchester), for the most outstanding exhibit. 

Jamaica Plain High School, for an informal garden at the Spring Show. 

Johnson Bros., for a display of camellias. 

Harold W. Knowlton, for a display of bearded iris. 

Littlefield-Wyman Nurseries, for an industrial planting at the Spring Show. 

Lommerse & Heemskerk, for a display of tulips. 

Massachusetts Department of Public Works, for a typical roadside rest 
area at the Spring Show. 

Massachusetts Orchid Society, for a group of orchids at the Spring Show. 

34 



Medals and Certificates 

Silver Medals 

The Merrys, for a display of daffodils. 

National Association of Gardeners, Boston Branch, for a contemporary 
spring garden at the Spring Show. 

National Association of Gardeners, Cape Cod Branch, for an informal 
garden at the Spring Show. 

National Association of Gardeners, Newport Rhode Island Branch, for a 
spring garden at the Spring Show. 

New York State Agricultural Experiment Station, Geneva, New York, for 
an educational exhibit of fruit. 

Pride's, for a display of daffodils. 

Dr. H. E. Raymond, for a display of hybrid tea roses. 

Frank W. Sellner, for a chrysanthemum garden. 

John Thibodeau, for a collection of spring flowering bulbs. 

Charles Vasaturo, for a display of gladiolus arrangements. 

Bronze Medals 

Lewis Alfuso, for a display of chrysanthemum arrangements. 

Arrowhead Gardens, for a display of miscellaneous cut flowers at the 
Spring Show. 

B reek's, for a display of gladiolus. 

Robert B. Choate, for a collection of camellias. 

Mrs. Preston E. Corey, for a display of bearded iris. 

P. dejager & Sons, Inc., for a collection of daffodils. 

Norfolk Co. Agricultural School, for an informal garden at the Spring Show. 

Mrs. Francis P. Sears, for a display of camellias. 

John Thibodeau, for a display of spring flowering bulbs. 

John Thibodeau, for an informal garden at the Spring Show. 

First Class Certificates 

Cypripedium Canopis, exhibited by Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Stone. 
Cypripedium Marlazion, exhibited by Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Stone. 

Awards of Merit 

Apple Geneva Red Mcintosh, exhibited by the New York State Agricul- 
tural Experiment Station, Geneva, New York. 

35 



Medals and Certificates 

Votes of Commendation 

Carnation Garnet Sim, exhibited by Streiferd's Greenhouses at the Spring 

Show. 
Cypripedium Westonbirt Hellas, exhibited by Mrs. Edwin S. Webster at 

the Spring Show. 
Narcissus triandms Sulphur Queen, exhibited by John Thibodeau. 
Rose Pink Champagne, exhibited by Johnson Bros, at the Spring Show. 
Rose White Butterfly, exhibited by Johnson Bros, at the Spring Show. 

Cultural Certificates 

Arnold Arboretum for Azalea schlippenbachi, at the Spring Show. 

Boston Public School Garden at Woburn, for a display of vegetables and 

flowers. 
Boston Public School Garden at Woburn, for a display of vegetables. 
Herbert Branch, for Miltonia Radiant at the Spring Show. 
Jan deGraaff, Gresham, Oregon, for a display of Lilium Auratum "Red 

Band Strain". 
Thomas Galvin, for a display of dahlias. 
Johnson Bros., for Rose Happiness at the Spring Show. 
Stewart Johnson, for a group of cypripediums. 
William Raymond, for azaleas and cyclamen at the Spring Show. 
Edna Roberts, York, Maine, for saintpaulias at the Spring Show. 
John Sullivan, for a group of amaryllis at the Spring Show. 
John Sullivan, for a group of chrysanthemums. 
Bruno Tosi, for a group of calla lilies. 
Marinus Vander Pol, for tree peonies at the Spring Show. 
Fred Walters, for a group of odontoglossums at the Spring Show. 

Vote of Thanks 

Mrs. Harold W. Knowlton, for a collection of iris buttons. 

Special Commendation — Gold Citation 

Breck's, for pleasing informal design and use of interesting spring plant 
materials at the Spring Show. 

Alexander I. Heimlich, for a naturalistic composition and wise use of ap- 
propriate materials at the Spring Show. 

Kelsey-Highlands Nursery, for simplicity and restraint in naturalistic beau- 
ty at the Spring Show. 

36 



Ml 



Report of the Treasurer 
For the Year Ended December 31, 1958 

president, Ladies and Gentlemen, although the operation of 
your Society for 1958 does not show a profit, the financial out- 
look, especially for the future, is much more promising than it 
was a year ago. The profit from the 1958 Spring Flower Show was $28,156 
compared to $51,254 for 1957, due to the fact that we had a few snowy 
and stormy days while the Show was in progress. May I add that the 
overall results in 1958 were a great deal better than in 1957. The actual 
deficit for 1958 was $12,567.00, in comparison to a deficit of $35,933.00 
for 1957. The deficit for 1958 can be largely attributed to the pointing 
of the building and the necessary repairs to our roof drains. The cost of 
this work was over $7,000 and unfortunately this was not provided for 
in the budget. 

On the brighter side, income figures for 1958, totaling $198,461.00, 
were encouraging in every category. One of the most significant facts, 
when the figures are studied for the past two years, is the great improve- 
ment in the financial condition of our magazine Horticulture. The loss 
on this operation has been reduced from $33,179 in 1957 to $1,336 in 
1958. Horticulture should, in the very near future, pay its own way, 
or break even, and that, of course, would greatly improve the entire fi- 
nancial structure of the Society. 

Unforeseen new problems are constantly arising but since no large 
building expenses are in the offing, this should also improve our financial 
affairs. 

In closing may I say that we are looking forward to the time when we 
can report that all the departments of the Society will be operating in 
the black. 

The complete statement of our financial report for 1958, as prepared by 
our auditors, is available to our members who might be interested in a 
detailed analysis of the figures. 



Respectfully submitted, 



Oliver F. Ames, 
Assistant Treasurer 




37 



Statement of Financial Condition at December 31, 1958 

Assets 

Cash in Banks and On Hand $ 32,186.69 

Accounts Receivable— Horticulture 17,795.71 

Accounts Receivable $ 19,995.71 

Deduct: Allowance for losses in 

collection 2,200.00 

$ 17,795.71 

Accounts Receivable— Other 174.25 

Investments at Book Value 777,192.53 

Eleanor Tudor Trust 7,942.50 

Capital Assets 606,195.92 

Real Estate $498,564.63 

Improvements and Additions to Building 61,050.82 
Library I 46,580.47 

$606,195.92 

Deferred Charges 17,528.44 

Spring Show, 1959 $ 1,856.03 

Prepaid Insurance and Expense ......... 5,985.96 

Inventory of Books, Binders, etc 9,686.45 



$ 17,528.44 



$1,459,016.04 



Liabilities and Capital Funds 

Liabilities $ 38,992.13 

Accounts Payable $ 32,242.83 

Taxes Withheld 1,932.81 

Accrued Commissions— Horticulture . . . 3,442.89 

Social Security Taxes Accrued 137.52 

Credit Balance Accounts Receivable 604.36 

Deposits on Rentals 451.00 

Accrued Expense 180.72 

$ 38,992.13 

Eleanor Tudor Trust Fund 8,573.92 

Principal $ 7,942.50 

Unexpended Income 631.42 

$ 8,573.92 

Sundry Funds 845,063.50 

Special Uses: 

Principal $241,910.72 

Unexpended Income . . . 10,008.75 251,919.47 

38 



General Uses: 

Principal 593,144.03 

$845,063.50 

Capital 564,524.70 

Surplus (Capital) 144,687.92 

Deficit 142,826.13 



$1,459,016.04 



Statement of Income and Expenditures 

Income 

1958 1957 

Income from Investments $ 70,143.06 $ 75,691.90 

Membership Fees (after member's subscription 

to Horticulture) 49,959.47 45,407.85 

Rentals 11,386.62 7,144.28 

Spring Show 68,559.53 104,615.94 

Autumn Show 3,237.50 3,036.11 

Horticulture Loss 1,336.43 33,179.20 

Other Receipts 2,986.83 608.00 



Expenditures 



$198,461.58 $197,252.66 



Building Expenses $ 44,152.40 $ 37,580.65 

Library Expenses 14,465.42 25,108.67 

Office and General Salaries and Expenses 95,434.01 101,527.61 

Awards, Lectures, Medals and Certificates: 

Lectures paid from General Funds .... 1,211.85 865.40 
Prizes, Medals, and Certificates paid from 

General Funds 3,796.38 3,123.17 

Prizes, Medals, and Certificates paid from 

Spring Show 40,402.75 53,362.36 

Medals, Lectures, etc. paid from Restricted 

Funds 880.00 1,399.40 

Awards at Shows paid from Restricted 

Funds 3,403.51 4,641.14 

Miscellaneous Exhibition Expenses 4,497.44 4,273.47 

$208,243.76 $ 231,881.87 

Net Loss-All Funds $ 9,782.18 $ 34,629.21 

Elimination of Expenses Included Above Paid 

From Income of Restricted Funds $ 6,578.80 8,043.46 

$ 3,203.38 26,585.75 
Elimination of Income Included Above 

Allocated to Restricted Funds $ 9,363.66 9,347.79 



Net Loss-General Funds $ 12,567.04 $ 35,933.54 

39 



Books Added to the Library 
May 1, 1958- May 1, 1959 

Gardening 

Agri-Horticultural Society. Horticultural diary, 1956-1957. Hydera- 
bad, India, 1956-57 
Baker, S. S. Miracle gardening. New York, 1958 
Betts, Kay. The gardener's almanack. Mount Vernon, N. Y., 1958 
Caldwell, Sam. The old dirt dobber's scrapbook. New York, 1958 
Christopher, E. P. Introductory horticulture. New York, 1958 
Conover, H. S. Grounds maintenance handbook; 2d ed. New York, 

1958 
Denisen, E. L. Principles of horticulture. New York, 1958 
Hyams, Edward. The speaking garden. London, 1957 
Jex-Blake, A. J., ed. Gardening in East Africa; 4th ed. London, 1958 
Peigelbeck, Will. The complete book of gardening and lawn care; 2d ed. 

New York, 1958 
Rockwell, F. F., ed. 10,000 garden questions answered by 20 experts; 

2d ed. New York, 1959 
Smith, L. P. & Searle, S. A. Weatherwise gardening. London, 1958 
Whittemore, R. D., ed. Garden ideas and projects. New York, 1959 

Propagation and Pruning 

Garner, R. J. Grafter's handbook; 2d ed. London, 1959 
Howell, O. B. Pruning without pain. Missoula, Montana, 1958 
Leopold, A. C. Auxins and plant growth. Berkeley, Calif., 1958 
Steffek, E. F. Pruning made easy. New York, 1958 

Auxiliary Sciences 

Soils 

Rodale, J. I. (and others) Encyclopedia of organic gardening. Em- 

maus, Penna., 1959 
Rodale, J. L, comp. The world's happiest gardeners. Emmaus, Penna., 

1959 
Russell, E. J. The world of the soil. London, 1957 

Weeds and Weed Control 

Cilkey, H. M. Weeds of the Pacific Northwest. Corvallis, Ore., 1957 
Isely, Duane. Weed identification and control in the North Central 
states. Ames, la., 1958 

40 



Books Added to the Library 

Flower Gardening 

Candolle, A. de. Origin of cultivated plants (reprint of 2d ed., 1886) 
New York, 1959 

Everett, P. C. A summary of the culture of California plants at the 
Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden. Claremont, 1957 

Field, Xenia. The housewife book of window box gardening. Letch- 
worth, Eng., 1957 

Gannon, Ruth. Easy ways to a beautiful garden. New York, 1959 

Genders, Roy. Bulbs all the year round. London, 1955 

Heath, R. E. Miniature rock gardening in troughs and pans. London, 
1957 

Klaber, Doretta. Rock garden plants; new ways to use them around your 
home. New York, 1959 

Lemmon, R. S. & Sherman, C. L. Flowers of the world in full color. 
New York, 1958 

Northwest Bulb Growers' Association. Handbook on bulb growing and 
forcing. Mount Vernon, Wash., 1957 

Pirone, P. P. Tree maintenance; 3rd ed. New York, 1959 

Potter, C. H. Perennials in the garden for lasting beauty. New York, 
1959. 

Skinner, H. T., ed. Garden plants in color. Portland, Ore., 1958 

Watkins, J. V. & Wolfe, H. S. Your Florida garden; 3rd ed. Gaines- 
ville, 1958 

Woman's Club of Havana. Flowering plants from Cuban gardens; 2nd 
ed. New York, 1958 

Greenhouse and House Plants 

Ballard, E. D. Garden in your house. New York, 1958 
Crockett, J. U. Window sill gardening. New York, 1958 
Flower Grower. Indoor gardening. Greenwich, Conn., 1958 
Kiaer, Eigil. The complete guide to indoor plants. New York, 1958 
Laurie, Alex (and others) Commercial flower forcing; 6th ed. New 
York, 1958 

Monographs 

American Hemerocallis Society. Hemerocallis checklist, 1893-July 1, 

1957. Topeka, Kan., 1957 
American Orchid Society. Beginners' handbook. Cambridge, Mass., 

1955-57 
American Rose Society. American rose annual, 1958-1959. Columbus, 

O., 1958-59 
Blunt, Wilfred. Tulipomania. Harmondsworth, Eng., 1950 
Buxbaum, Franz. Cactus culture; tr. by Vera Higgins. London, 1958 
Clifford, Derek. Pelargoniums, including the popular geranium. Lon- 
don, 1958 

41 



Books Added to the Library 

Fairbrother, F. Roses. Harmondsworth, Eng., 1958 

Genders, Roy. Anemones. London, 1956 

Hertrich, William. Camellias in the Huntington gardens, vol. 3. San 

Marino, Calif., 1959 
McFarland, J. H., Co. Modern roses V. Harrisburg, Pa., 1958 
Milsted, M. F. Growing African violets in the home. London, 1958 
Parrett, Ronald. The Russell lupin. Andover, Eng., 1959 
Quinn, C. E. Daffodils, outdoors and in. New York, 1959 
Randolph, L. F., ed. Garden irises. St. Louis, Mo., 1959 
Rockwell, F. F. & Grayson, E. C. The Rockwells' complete book of roses. 

Garden City, N. Y., 1958 
Royal Horticultural Society. The daffodil and tulip year book, 1959. 

London, 1958 
Royal Horticultural Society. The lily year book, 1959. London, 1958 
Royal Horticultural Society. The rhododendron and camellia year book, 

1959. London, 1958 
Tourje, E. C, ed. Camellia culture. New York, 1958 
Traub, H. P. The amaryllis manual. New York, 1958 

Fruits, Vegetables and Herbs 

Brownlow, M. E. Herbs and the fragrant garden. Kent, Eng., 1957 
Chandler, W. H. Evergreen orchards; 2d ed. Phil., 1958 
Clarke, J. H. Small fruits for your home garden. Garden City, 1958 
Farwell, Mrs. A. J. Have fun with herbs. Lake Forest, 111., 195-? 
Green, S. B. Vegetable gardening; 2d ed. St. Paul, Minn., 1899 
Mowry, Harold (and others). Miscellaneous tropical and sub-tropical 

fruits. Gainesville, Fla., 1953 
Shoemaker, J. S. & Teskey, B. J. E. Tree fruit production. New York, 

1959 
Sturrock, David. Fruits for southern Florida. Stuart, Fla., 1959 
Thoreau, H. D. Wild apples: history of the apple tree. Worcester, 

Mass., 1956 
Vicknair, Ulger. Le jardinier, economique et productif de la Louisiane. 

New Orleans, 1867. 

Nursery Management 

Pinney, J. J. Beginning in the nursery business; rev. ed. Chicago, 1958 
The Plant buyer's guide; 6th ed. Boston, 1958 

Garden Club and Flower Show Management 

Bryant, C. B., ed. Progress through perfectly planned programs for gar- 
den clubs. New York, 1957 

Buchanan, Mrs. G. T. & Wilson, Mrs. A. R. Four hundred thousand 
strong. New York, 1958 

Mayes, F. M. Program patterns. Phil., 1958 

South Carolina Camellia Society. Camellia show handbook. Charles- 



ton, 1958 



42 



Books Added to the Library 

Conservation 

Huth, Hans. Nature and the American. Berkeley, Calif., 1957 
Jarrett, Henry, ed. Perspectives on conservation. Baltimore, 1958 
Stevens, James. The green power: the story of public law 273. Seattle, 
1958 ' 

Garden Design 

Atkinson, R. E. Landscaping for outdoor living. Los Angeles, 1958 

Brostrom, Ethel. How to plan your porch and patio. New York, 1956 

Crowe, Sylvia. Garden design. London, 1958 

Evison, J. R. B. Gardening for display. London, 1958 

Flower Grower. Landscaping the small home. Greenwich, Conn., 1958 

Nightingale, F. B. Garden lighting. Altadena, Calif., 1958 

Gathorne-Hardy, Robert. The tranquil gardener. London, 1958 

Rose, J. C. Creative gardens. New York, 1958 

Sunset Magazine. How to build fences and gates; 2d ed. Menlo Park, 

Calif., 1958 
Taylor, A. D., comp. A partial list of plants available for various uses in 

general landscape planting. Cleveland, O., 1916 
Thomas, G. L., jr. Garden pools, water-lilies and goldfish. Princeton, 

N. J., 1958 
Thomas, G. S. Colour in the winter garden. Woking, Eng., 1957 

Botany 

Clement, I. D. (and others) Guide to the Atkins Garden. Cienfuegos, 

Cuba, 1954 
Daubenmire, R. F. Plants and environment; 2d ed. New York, 1959 
Elliott, F. C. Plant breeding and cytogenetics. New York, 1958 
Fernald, M. L. & Kinsey, A. C. Edible wild plants; revised by R. C. Rol- 
lins. New York, 1958 
Gill, N. T. & Vear, K. C. Agricultural botany. London, 1958 
Linne, Carl von. Species plantarum; a facsimile of the first edition 1753. 

London, 1957 
McCormick, Jack. The living forest. New York, 1959 
Nissen, Claus. Herbals of five centuries. Zurich, 1958 
Northen, H. T. Introductory plant science; 2d ed. New York, 1958 
Parmentier, M. Recherches sur les vegetaux nourrissans. Paris, 1781 
Thomson, B. F. The changing face of New England. New York, 1958 
U.S. Brookhaven National Laboratory. Genetics in plant breeding. Up- 
ton, N. Y., 1956 

Monographs 

Backeberg, Curt. Die cactaceae, vol. 1-2. Jena, 1958-1959 
Sealy, J. R. A revision of the genus camellia. London, 1958 
Smith, A. H. The mushroom hunter's field guide. Ann Arbor, Mich., 
1958 

43 



Books Added to the Lebrary 

Urquhart, B. L., ed. The rhododendron. Sharpthorne, Eng., 1958 
Waters, C. E. Ferns; a manual for the northeastern states. New York, 
1908 

Floras— North America 

Birdsong, G. M. Texas wild flowers. San Antonio, 1957 

Dorman, Caroline. Flowers native to the deep South. Baton Rouge, 

1958 
Hill, C. C. Spring flowers of the lower Columbia Valley. Seattle, 1958 
Hitchcock, C. L. (and others) Vascular plants of the Pacific North- 
west, pt. 4. Ericaceae through campanulaceae. Seattle, 1959 
Petrides, G. A. Field guide to trees and shrubs. Boston, 1958 

Floras— Other Countries 

Allen, F. H. The rain forests of Golfo Dulce. Gainesville, Fla., 1956 
Clapham, A. R. (and others) Flora of the British Isles; illustrations, pt. 

1. Pteridophyta— papilionaceae. Cambridge, Eng., 1957 
Degener, Otto. Flora Hawaiiensis, book 5. Oahu, 1957 
Grigson, Geoffrey. The Shell guide to the trees. London, 1958 
Hargreaves, Dorothy and Bob. Hawaii blossoms. Portland, Ore., 1958 
Ross-Craig, Stella. Drawings of British plants: pt. 12. Umbelliferae (1) 

London, 1958 
Storer, D. P. Familiar trees and cultivated plants of Jamaica. London, 

1958 

Poetry and Story 

Clark, E. A. The song of our national parks and flowers. Rock Island, 
111., 1958 

Giraud, I. E., illus. The flowers of Shakespeare. Faversham, Eng., 
1846 

Kieran, John, ed. John Kieran's treasury of great nature writings. Gar- 
den City, 1957 

Stout, Ruth. Company coming. New York, 1958 

Flower Arrangement 

Bolton, E. R. Dried flowers with a fresh look. New York, 1958 
Clapp, Kate, ed. Sixty artistic arrangements, by Akron's judges and top 

arrangers. Akron, 0., 195-? 
Clements, J. A. A treasury of rose arrangements and recipes. New York, 

1959 
Cyphers, E. H. Modem art in flower arrangement. New York, 1959 
Dnnlop, H. P. Flower arranging for fun. New York, 1959 
Ferry, E. S. Symbolism in flower arrangement. New York, 1958 
Gannon, Ruth. New ways with dried flowers. New York, 1958 
Gorham, H. H. & Oshikawa, J. Correspondence course in Japanese flow- 
er arrangement. Tokyo, 1940 

44 



Books Added to the Library 

Hayes, N. G. Drama with dry materials. Berkeley, Calif., 1958 
Herrigel, G. L. Zen in the art of flower arrangement. Newton Centre, 

Mass., 1958 
McClinton, K. M. Flower arrangement in the church; rev. ed. New 

York, 1958 
Oshikawa, J. & Gorham, H. H. Manual of Japanese flower arrangement. 

Tokyo, 1936 
Riefel, C. von. A folio of fruit (prints) London, 1957 
Rutt, A. H. The art of flower and foliage arrangement. New York, 

1958 
Schulke, Z. W. Hanging flower and plant decorations. New York, 1958 
Smedley, D. W. Creating flower and other artistic arrangements. Salt 

Lake City, Utah, 1954 
Squires, Mabel. The art of drying plants and flowers. New York, 1958 
Takahashi, M. C. Simplified manual of Japanese flower arrangement. 

Japan, 1959 
Vogue in flowers; 10th ed. Chicago, 1958 
Waugh, Dorothy. A handbook of Christmas decoration. New York, 

1958 
Webb, Lida. Popular styles of Japanese flower arrangement. New York, 

1959 

Biography 

Dictionary of American biography, v. 22, suppl. 2. To Dec. 31, 1940. 

New York, 1958 
Jewett, F. L. & McCausland, C. L. Plant hunters Boston, 1958 
Peare, C. O. A scientist of two worlds: Louis Agassiz. New York, 1958 

Gardens Around the i Vorld 
Bartram, William. The travels of William liartram; naturalist's edition, 

ed. by Francis Harper, 1958 
Bellingrath-Morse Foundation. Bellingrath Gardens and the Bellingrath 

home. Mobile, Ala., 1958 
Dutton, J. P. Enjoying America's gardens. New York, 1958 
The Gardens of England and Wales, 1958. London, 1958 
Hepburn, Andrew. The Caribbean and the Bahamas. Boston, 1958 
Ishimoto, Tatsuo. The art of the Japanese garden. New York, 1958 
Yoshida, Tetsuro. Gardens of Japan. London, 1958 

Children's Books 

Hancock, J. E. The school garden; pt. 1. London, 1955 

Hutchins, R. E. Strange plants and their ways. Chicago, 1958 

Selsam, M. E. Plants that heal. New York, 1959 

Swain, S. N. Plants of woodland and wayside. Garden City, N. Y., 

1958 
Uncle Philip's conversations with young people. New York, 1854 

45 



Books Added to the Library 

Bibliography 

Blanchard, J. R. & Ostvold, Harold. Literature of agricultural research. 
Los Angeles, 1958 

Bowker, R. R., company. Subject guide to books in print, ed. by S. L. 
Prakken. New York, 1958 

Great Britain. Agriculture, Fisheries and Food Ministry. A selected and 
classified list of books relating to agriculture, horticulture, etc.; 4th ed. 
London, 1958 

Loxton, G. E. Camellias; English literature and illustrations, a bibliogra- 
phy. Flimwell, Eng., 1954 

U.S. Agricultural Dept. Botany subject index, 15 vol. Boston, 1958 

Hunt, R. M. M. Catalogue of botanical books in the collection of Rachel 
McMasters Miller Hunt, comp. by Jane Quinby. Pittsburgh, 1958 




Garden of Mr. Cyril H. Jones, Cotuit 
Awarded a Silver Medal 



46 




Garden of Mrs. Stuart M. Crocker, Chatham 
Awarded a Silver Medal 




Garden of Mr. and Mrs. G. L. Rowsey, Hatch ville, Falmouth 
Awarded a Garden Certificate 



47 



Gifts to the Library 

The Massachusetts Horticultural Society acknowledges with thanks gifts to 
the Library from the following donors: 

American Orchid Society. 

Beginners' handbook. 
Arnold, Mrs. R. A. 

Kieran, J., ed. John Kieran's treasury of great nature writings. 
Bailey Hortorium. 

Hunt, R. M. Catalogue of botanical books in the collection of Rachel 
McM asters Hunt, comp. by Jane Quinby. 
Blattner, Clara, Estate 

Conder, Josiah. The theory of Japanese flower arrangements. 

Gorham, H. H. & Oshikawa, J. Correspondence course in Japanese 
flower arrangement. 
Kuck, L. E. The art of Japanese gardens. 

Oshikawa, J. & Gorham, H. H. Manual of Japanese flower arrangement. 
Casey, Mrs. Stephen R. 

Crowe, Sylvia. Garden design. 
Coulter, Francis C. 

Ellwanger & Barry. Supplementary catalogue. 
Dacy, Arthur L. 

Elliott, F. R. Hand-book for fruit growers. 

Green, S. B. Vegetable gardening; 2d ed. rev. 

Greiner, T. How to make the garden pay; 2d rev. and enl. ed. 

Lachaume, Jean. Methode elementaire pour tailler et conduire soi- 
meme les poiriers, pommiers, et autres arbres fruitiers; 2de ed. 

Taylor, A. D., comp. A partial list of plants available for various uses 
in general landscape planting. 
Hayes, Naida Gilmore. 

Hayes, N. G. Drama with dry materials. 
Hollingsworth, Buckner. 

Hollingsworth, B. Flower chronicles. 
Parker, Mrs. William A. 

Gathorne-Hardy, Robert. The tranquil gardener. 
Pearse, Mrs. Langdon. 

Waters, C. E. Ferns; a manual for the northeastern states. 
Storer, Dorothy P. 

Storer, D. P. Familiar trees and cultivated plants of Jamaica. 
Wheeler, Wilfrid. 

Hoare, Clement. A practical treatise on the cultivation of the grape 
vine on open walls; 3d American ed. 
Wister, John C. 

Arthur Hoyt Scott Horticultural Foundation. Swarthmore plant notes, 
vol. 2, part 1-2. 
World Friendship House, Boston. 

Agri-Horticultural Society. Horticultural diary, 1956-1957. 

48 




Garden of Dr. and Mrs. Edward Robertson, Nonquit 
Awarded a Bronze Medal 




Garden of Mrs. Mark Duff, New Bedford 
Awarded a Bronze Medal 



49 



Benevolent Fraternity Fruit and Flower Mission 

I" 



y w^ his is the eighty-ninth annual report of the work of Fruit and 
Flower Mission. Our Mission is the pioneer in this type of service 
to elderly people. The original thought of the founder was, to bring 
happiness into the lives of those less fortunate. The friendly interest of the 
contributors has touched the lives of hundreds of lonely people each year 
since 1869. 

The exhibitors at Horticultural Hall have been mindful of the joy which 
the flowers left after the flower shows can bring to the ill and lonely. 
We have received flowers from eight shows this year. Distribution was 
made to hospitals, nursing homes, clinics, institutions, and distributing 
centers in the crowded sections of Boston. Special bouquets were sent 
to individuals living in one room "Homes". 

Fresh vegetables from the Harvest Show, afford a real treat for our 
recipients who live alone and change the menus in small nursing homes, 
where fresh vegetables are seldom used. The generous donation of apples 
from this Show were a treat for children and old folks. 

The summer hamper work has felt the impact of progress, more than 
any part of the work. For the past few years railroad baggage facilities 
have been cancelled in some of the co-operating towns. This year, four 
have been cancelled. Some of these communities have found it impossible 
to send hampers; others are sending by local express or private car. Har- 
vard is delivering by beach wagon. Last summer Mr. and Mrs. Sturdy, of 
Harvard, drove over 1800 miles in delivering the flowers to Jamaica Plain 
Neighborhood House and to North End Union. 

Duxbury and Groton sent by local express. Garden Clubs in towns where 
there is no baggage service sent checks to this office for the purchase of 
fresh fruit or some dainty for the recipients in nursing homes and for our 
shut-ins. 

I have visited each distributing center at least once during the hamper 
season and spent every Friday at Bulfinch Place Chapel, helping with 
flower distribution. 

An interesting and helpful Hamper Conference was held on October 
twenty-fourth. Three hundred thirty hampers and cartons of flowers, fruits 
and vegetables were received from sixteen towns. In addition three hun- 
dred forty-one large pails and five hundred eighty-seven cans of flowers 
and ten cartons of vegetables were received from Harvard. This was the 
outstanding contribution of the season. We are deeply grateful to the 
chairman for her devotion to the work and appreciate the co-operation of 
all who contributed so generously throughout the season. 

Seven hundred thirty-five baskets and trays were sent during the 
Thanksgiving, Christmas and Easter holidays. Garden Clubs not only con- 
tribute flowers to brighten the summer days, they are outstanding in their 
contribution of canned food dainties, fruit, and checks to help in the 
holiday work. Contributions of food and money come from Alliances, 
Church Groups, Girl Scouts, Camp Fire Girls, Women's Clubs, Secretarial 

50 



Schools, and many individuals. We appreciate the thought which prompts 
each donation whether large or small. 

Sixty-six visits have been made during the year. These visits mean more 
than we know, to these elderly people who are alone. They have many 
problems that are important and very real to them. A little time spent in 
listening seems to give assurance that there is someone who "cares". The 
world of a shut-in is small and a few minutes, spent with someone outside 
of their world, gives comfort and seems to make life just a little easier, 
when they find they have a friend in whom they can confide. Magazines 
and books are always welcome in nursing homes. One seldom sees evi- 
dence of these in rooms where visits have been made. 

The Boston State Hospital program has been carried on each month 
for the ninth consecutive year. Six indoor parties during the winter with 
entertainment and refreshments, with special attention given the holiday 
seasons and six outings by M.T.A. bus during the summer gave many 
hours of relaxation to the patients of Ward N. Outings were held at Public 
Garden, with a ride on the Swan Boats, Franklin Park, Middlesex Fells, 
Norumbega Park, Castle Island. Two weenie roasts were held affording 
the patients an opportunity of preparing the weenies and serving the 
lunch. Coca-cola is provided by the Mission and lunches are provided 
by the hospital. Afternoon refreshments of candy, fresh fruit, or pop corn 
are always a treat for these patients. Thirty-six to forty women enjoy 
these outings each month during the summer. The ward numbers sixty 
six women and very few have visitors. 

Our efforts have been recognized by the hospital staff and the Massa- 
chusetts Association for Mental Health, as one of the best types of therapy. 

Tickets to the Spring Flower Show always give a lasting treat to our 
elderly friends. This year twelve tickets were received from the Junior 
League Garden Club Of Boston and two tickets from the Hyde Park 
Garden Club. 

It has been our privilege to be located in the present office for thirty- 
five years. We acknowledge, with gratitude, the many courtesies which 
we continue to enjoy, through the interest of the Massachusetts Horticul- 
tural Society. 

We especially acknowledge the contributions made by the exhibitors. 
Hospital wards, nursing home rooms and the rooms of hundreds of shut- 
ins have been made brighter after the flower shows. 

Words cannot express my gratitude to the volunteers for hours of 
service so willingly given. Volunteers are the very essence of the work 
and they are indispensible. 

Our contributors are volunteers also. We need every one. ... To all 
who have remembered the work of Fruit and Flower Mission in any way, 
a very sincere "thank you". 



Esther L. Camfield 
Executive Secretary 



51 



Honorary Members 

1942 F. A. Bartlett, Stamford, Connecticut 

1942 Dr. William A. Dayton, Washington, D. C. 

1942 Joseph B. Garle, Stewartstown, Pennsylvania 

1942 Rorert Moses, New York, New York 

1942 G. G. Nearing, Ridgewood, New Jersey 

1942 Mrs. Elizareth Peterson, Scarsdale, New York 

1942 George H. Pring, St. Louis, Missouri 

1942 Norman Taylor, New York, New York 

1942 C. J. Van Bourgondien, Babylon, Long Island, New York 

1942 Richard Wellington, Geneva, New York 

1943 Alhert G. Burrage, Ipswich, Massachusetts 
1943 Vincent DePetris, Grosse Farms, Michigan 

1943 Henry T. Skinner, Washington, D. C. 

1944 WiLFRro Wheeler, Hatchville, Falmouth, Massachusetts 

1944 Richardson Wright, Chatham, Massachusetts 

1945 Alhert Hulley, Middleboro, Massachusetts 

1946 Walter B. Clark, San Jose, California 

1946 Mrs. John H. Cunningham, Brookline, Massachusetts 

1946 Daniel W. O'Brien, Boston, Massachusetts 

1946 Edmund F. Palmer, Vineland Station, Ontario, Canada 

1947 Thomas H. Everett, New York Botanical Garden, New York 
1947 James J. Hurley, Newton Highlands, Massachusetts 

1947 Isarella Preston, Lancaster, England 

1948 Stedman Buttrick, Concord, Massachusetts 
1948 Ernest F. Coe, Coconut Grove, Florida 

1948 Eric Walther, San Francisco, California 

1949 Morris Carter, Boston, Massachusetts 
1949 Henry Kohankie, Painesville, Ohio 

1949 A. Kenneth Simpson, Tarry town, New York 

1949 Harold B. Tukey, East Lansing, Michigan 

1950 Montague Free, Hyde Park, New York 
1950 Dr. Wilson Popenoe, Antigua, Guatemala 

1950 George L. Slate, Geneva, New York 

1951 William Hertrich, San Marino, California 
1951 Dr. Samuel L. Emsweller, Beltsville, Maryland 
1951 Jan de Graaff, Gresham, Oregon 

1951 Thomas C. Desmond, Newburgh, New York 

1951 Mrs. G. Kennard Wakefield, Milton, Massachusetts 

1952 Sir William Wright Smith, Edinburgh, Scotland 
1952 Dr. Walter E. Lammerts, Livermore, California 
1952 Prof. Alex Laurie, Eustis, Florida 

1952 Dr. Donald Forsha Jones, New Haven, Conn. 

1953 Dr. Alhert Francis Blakeslee, Northampton, Massachusetts 
1953 Arie F. den Boer, Des Moines, Iowa 

1953 Dr. Victor A. Tdedjens, Marion, Ohio 

1953 Fred Edmunds, Portland, Oregon 

1954 Arnold Davis, Cleveland, Ohio 

1954 Joseph Lane, New York, New York 

1955 Dr. Richard P. White, Washington, D. C. 

1955 Paul Vossrerg, Westbury, Long Island, New York 

1955 Mrs. Irving C. Wright, Milton, Massachusetts 

52 



Honorary Members 

1955 Miss Sarah E. Brassill, Weymouth, Massachusetts 

1956 Eugene S. Boerner, Newark, New York 
1956 Frank Reinelt, Capitola, California 

1956 Mrs. Arthur P. Teele, Boston, Mass. 

1957 W. Ray Hastings, Harrisburg, Penna. 
1957 Dr. R. E. Kleinsorge, Silverton, Oregon 
1957 Jacques Legendre, Wachapreague, Virginia 

1957 Charles H. Perkins, Newark, New York 

1958 Mrs. Lucien B. Taylor, Dover, Massachusetts 
1958 Mrs. Roy Arthur Hunt, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

1958 J. J. Grullemans, Mentor, Ohio 

1959 Prof. L. C. Chadwick, Columbus, Ohio 

1959 Mrs. Susan Delano McKelvey, Boston, Massachusetts 

1959 Arno H. Nehrling, Needham, Massachusetts 

1959 Conrad L. Wirth, Washington, D. C. 




Garden of Mrs. G. H. A. Clowes, Woods Hole 
Awarded a Bronze Medal 



53 




Garden of Mr. and Mrs. Richardson Wright, Chatham 
Awarded a Garden Certificate 




Garden of Mrs. Marion C. Blossom, Cotuit 
Awarded a Bronze Medal 



54 



Necrology 

A list of the members of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, whose 
deaths were reported to the Membership Secretary, during the year. 



Mr. L. Sherman Adams 

Mrs. Daved E. Atwood 

Mrs. C. F. Augustin 

Franklin G. Balch, M.D. 

Mr. Edwin W. Barbehenn 

Mrs. Henry J. Barnes 

Mrs. Walter E. Barnes 

Mr. John Barnet 

Mr. Sddney W. Bartlett 

Mrs. Spaulding Bartlett 

Dr. Dennistoun M. Bell 

Mr. Harold T. Bent 

Mr. Frederick T. Bonham 

Mr. F. A. Bouvier 

Mr. Harold L. Brown 

Mrs. Holcombe J. Brown 

Mrs. William Bruckhauser 

Mrs. Francis V. Bulfinch 

Mr. Harry L. Burrage 

Mr. Russell Burrage 

Miss Marion E. Buswell 

Mr. Robert M. Butcher 

Mr. Aubrey B. Butler 

Mrs. Stanley P. Chase 

Miss Mabel Choate 

Mr. Richard F. Churchill 

Mr. Edward R. Cogswell 

Mr. William H. Coleman 

Mrs. Francis B. Crowninshield 

Miss M. Danforth 

Mrs. Hazel H. Davis 

Miss Mary Dexter 

Mr. Thomas P. Dooley 

Mr. William L. Doran 

Mr. Paul E. Dutelle 

Mrs. Thaxter Eaton 

Mr. Arthur L. Evans 

Rev. Edward Everett 

Mrs. Max Farrand 

Mr. William A. Flanagan 

Mr. Lawrence B. Fletcher 

Dr. Nathan Chandler Foot 

Mrs. Gilbert C. Freeauf 

Dr. Rowland G. Freeman 

Mr. William E. Freeman 

Hon. Alvan T. Fuller 

Mr. Albert Geiger Jr., 

Mr. Albert L. Gifford 



Mrs. Gustave W. Goerner 

Mrs. Ernest R. Grauman 

Mrs. T. C. Haffenreffer 

Mrs. Frank W. Hallowell 

Mrs. Jessie D. Hallowell 

Mrs. M. G. Haughton 

Mrs. Jesse E. Haynes 

Mrs. Hubert Hayter 

Mrs. W. E. Hayward 

Mr. George Hetzel 

Mr. Henry Wadsworth Hight 

Mr. Joseph H. Hill 

Miss Marion Hill 

Miss Laura B. Holden 

Prof. S. P. Hollister 

Miss Katherine A. Homans 

Mr. Fred Howlett 

Mrs. G. N. Hurd 

Mrs. Robert S. Ingram 

Mrs. Otis S. Johnson 

Miss Sabina F. Kelly 

Mr. Harlan P. Kelsey ' 

Mr. Harry A. Kinson 

Mrs. F. M. Knott 

Miss P. M. LaMontague 

Mrs. Joseph S. Leach 

Mrs. Edith D. LeBosquet 

Miss Edna L. Lentell 

Mr. Arthur S. Lewis 

Mrs. Henry M. Lewis 

Mr. William R. Linton 

Mr. Frederick J. List 

Mrs. William H. Lord 

Mrs. Guy Lowell 

Mrs. Fred B. Lund 

Mr. Thomas E. Lynch 

Miss Hazel W. MacDonald 

Mr. John C. Makepeace 

Mr. Edwin S. Martin 

Mr. Kenneth McDougall 

Mr. J. Franklin McElwain 

Mr. Francis V. Mead 

Miss E. Hildred Mitchell 

Miss Mary K. Morley 

Mrs. T. Morris Murray 

Mrs. W. H. Nichols 

Mrs. F. Sydney Nisbet 
Mr. Edwin Read Olin 



55 



Necrology 



Mrs. Gordon S. Pinkham 
Mr. Walter E. Piper 
Miss Mary L. Potter 
Mrs. Charles A. Poutasse 
Mr. Lewis I. Prouty 
Mrs. John M. Pullman 
Miss Louisa Putnam 
Mr. Louis H. Resnik 
Mrs. Arthur G. Rorbins 
Mr. W. F. Rogers 
Mr. W. Ormiston Roy 
Mr. William G. Rueter 
Miss Emma Safford 
Mrs. Edward Samson 
Mr. C. J. Santheson 
Mr. W. F. Senter 
Mr. Edwin F. Shepard 
Mr. Newton Shultes 
Mrs. Lincoln S. Simonds 
Miss Adeladde I. Smith 



Mrs. Howard B. S Prague 
Mrs. C. Brooks Stevens 
Mrs. E. Henry Stone 
Mrs. Howard T. Swain 
Miss Amie M. Sumner 
Mrs. Earle Talbot 
Mrs. Harry R. Talbot 
Mr. John C. Taylor 
Miss Mary Florence Thompson 
Mr. Oliver C. True 
Miss Sally E. Turner 
Dr. R. A. Van Meter 
Mr. Archibald Wagstoff 
Mrs. Harry H. Walker 
Mrs. Laurence J. Webster 
Mr. Arthur M. Wiggin 
Miss May E. Wiley 
Miss Elizabeth S. Wilkinson 
Mr. Walter P. Wright 
Mrs. Frederick R. Wulsin 
Dr. Poe Eng Yu 

SCOTT PHOTO 




An Herb and Salad Garden staged by the North Shore Garden Club at the 

1959 Spring Flower Show 



56 



Bequests to the Massachusetts 
Horticultural Society 

For more than a century and a quarter the Massachusetts Horticul- 
tural Society has been favored by the generosity of its members 
whose patronage has made possible an Endowment Fund for carrying 
on its multitudinous activities for the promotion of horticulture in this 
Commonwealth. Furthermore, the Society has contributed greatly to the 
ever-increasing development of horticultural influence and achievement 
throughout the country. It is hoped that the Massachusetts Horticultural 
Society will be remembered by those members who wish to distribute 
their funds for public benefaction in the fields of the arts and sciences. 
All bequests are tax-exempt. This Society enjoys an enviable reputation 
for its solid financial condition and its judicious method of handling 
investments. Since expenses for maintenance and activities are ever on 
the increase, additional funds are needed to carry on and to extend the 
services of this Society— "for the advancement of horticulture". 



Form of Bequest 

I give and bequeath to the Massachusetts Horticultural 
Society located in Boston, Massachusetts, the sum of 

to be used as the Board of Trustees 

may direct for the promotion of horticulture in its various 
forms and for extending the activities of the Society along 
educational lines. 

Signed 




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1961 

FLOWER SHOWS 

of the 

Massachusetts Horticultural Society 
IN HORTICULTURAL HALL 






JANUARY 11 through 13 
Camellia Show 

MARCH 11 through 19 

Wonderland Park, Revere 

Spring Show 

MAY 1 and 2 
Daffodil Show 

MAY 15 and 16 
Tulip Show 

JUNE 8 and 9 
Iris Show 

JUNE 19 and 20 
Rose Show 

JULY 19 
Hemerocallis Show 

AUGUST 11 
Gladiolus Show 

AUGUST 23 and 24 
Exhibition of the Products of Children's Gardens 

OCTOBER 19, 20, 21 and 22 
Harvest and Chrysanthemum Show 

(Dates subject to change) 



I960 YEARBOOK 

of the 

MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL 

SOCIETY 




ANNUAL REPORTS 
for 

1959 

AND A LIST OF BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 



FOREWORD— The Committee on Lectures and Publications has the 
honor to present herewith the 36th number of the Society's Yearbook, 
with which are combined the annual reports for the year 1959. 

Boston, Massachusetts, September 1, I960, Edward Dane, Chairman 




Sargent Wellman 
Elected a Trustee, May 2, 1960 



Bachrach Photo 



CONTENTS 

Board of Government 5 

Committees of the Society 7 

Results of the Balloting 8 

Reports of Officers and Committees 8 

President's Address 9 

Report of the Secretary 10 

Report of Committee on Exhibitions 12 

Report of Committee on Children's Gardens 14 

Report of Committee on Library 16 

Report of Committee on Prizes 18 

Albert C. Burrage Gold Vase 19 

Special Medal Awards 20 

Garden Committee Awards 22 

Medals and Certificates Awarded in 1959 27 

Report of the Treasurer 37 

Books Added to the Library 41 

Gifts to the Library 49 

Benevolent Fraternity Fruit and Flower Mission 51 

Honorary Members 54 

Necrology 56 

Bequests to the Massachusetts Horticultural Society 57 

Photos by Genereux and Fay Foto 

Our Cover Illustrations 

Front— Carolina rhododendron with and under planting of trilliums, 
ferns, jack-in-the-pulpit and pachysandra 

Photo by J. Horace McFarland Co. 

Back— Lovely orchid display inter-planted with maiden hair ferns, at 
the 1960 Spring Show 

Photo by New Bedford Sunday Standard 
3 




Attractive Display of Chrysanthemum arrangements, by Park Florist, at 

the 1959 Spring Show 




Garden Club of Philadelphia exhibit at the 1960 Spring Show 
Awarded a Gold Medal Certificate 



THE BOARD OF GOVERNMENT 

OF THE 

MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

President 
OLIVER WOLCOTT 

Vice Presidents 

EDWARD DANE 
STEDMAN BUTTRICK 

Trustees 

Oliver F. Ames ( 1961 ) Milford Lawrence ( 1962 ) 

Alhert C. Burrage (1963) Miss Helen C. Moseley (1961) 

Stedman Buttrick* Harold S. Ross (J.962) 

Edward Dane* Harold D. Stevenson (1962) 

Dr. John R. Havis (1962) Mrs. Roger S. Warner (1962) 

Allen W. Hixon (1963) Mrs. Edwin S. Werster (1961) 

Walter Hunnewell ( 1963 ) Sargent Wellman ( 1963 ) 

Seth L. Kelsey (1963) Oliver Wolcott* 

Harold W. Knowlton (1961) Dr. Donald Wyman (1961) 

Treasurer 
EDWARD DANE 

Assistant Treasurer 
OLIVER F. AMES 

Secretary 
ARNO H. NEHRLING 

* Members ex-officio. Dates are those of expiration terms. 




Spring Garden, staged by Peter Mezitt, Weston Nurseries, at the 1960 

Spring Show 




Oliver Woloott, left, awarding Peter Mezitt the Presidents Cup for his 
outstanding garden at the 1960 Spring Show 



COMMITTEES OF THE SOCIETY 

For the Year Ending May 1, 1961 

Executive Committee 
OLIVER WOLCOTT, Chairman 

OLIVER F. AMES EDWARD DANE 

STEDMAN BUTTRICK WALTER HUNNEWELL 

Finance Committee 

OLIVER WOLCOTT, Chairman 
OLIVER F. AMES EDWARD DANE 

Budget Committee 
OLIVER WOLCOTT, Chairman 
OLIVER F. AMES EDWARD DANE 

STEDMAN BUTTRICK WALTER HUNNEWELL 

Committee on Building 
OLIVER WOLCOTT, Chairman 
HAROLD D. STEVENSON SARGENT WELLMAN 

Membership Committee 

HAROLD W. KNOWLTON, Chairman 
ALLEN W. HIXON HAROLD S. ROSS 

Committee on Exhibitions 
HAROLD D. STEVENSON, Chairman 
EDWARD DANE SETH L. KELSEY 

DR. JOHN R. HAVIS MRS. WILLIAM A. PARKER 

Committee on Prizes 
MILFORD LAWRENCE, Chairman JOHN HURLEY, Vice-Chairman 

ALLEN W. HIXON HAROLD W. KNOWLTON JAMES SUTHERLAND 

Committee on Library 

ALBERT C. BURRAGE, Chairman 
HAROLD W. KNOWLTON MRS. EDWIN S. WEBSTER 

CARTER LEE DR. DONALD WYMAN SARGENT WELLMAN 

Committee on Lectures and Publications 

EDWARD DANE, Chairman 
ERNEST HOFTYZER HAROLD S. ROSS 

Committee on Special Medals 
HAROLD S. ROSS, Chairman 
HAROLD W. KNOWLTON HAROLD D. STEVENSON 

MILFORD LAWRENCE MRS. ROGER S. WARNER 

Committee on Gardens 

DR. DONALD WYMAN, Chairman 
ALEXANDER I. HEIMLICH A. W. SMITH 

MISS HELEN C. MOSELEY MRS. ROGER S. WARNER 

Committee on Children's Gardens Exhibitions 

MRS. ROGER S. WARNER, Chairman 
MRS. CHARLES F. HOVEY HENRY G. WENDLER 

Committee on the Albert C. Burrage Gold Vase 

ALBERT C. BURRAGE, Chairman 
DR. JOHN R. HAVIS MISS HELEN C. MOSELEY 

MILFORD LAWRENCE HAROLD D. STEVENSON 

Nominating Committee 
HAROLD S. ROSS, Chairman 
DR. JOHN R. HAVIS HAROLD D. STEVENSON 

MILFORD LAWRENCE MRS. ROGER S. WARNER 

Special Committee on Membership & Finances 

OLIVER F. AMES HAROLD W. KNOWLTON 

ARNO H. NEHRLING 



Results of the Balloting at the Annual Meeting 

At 4:00 o'clock the polls were closed, 59 votes having been cast, and 
the following persons were declared elected: 

President: (for one year) Mr. Oliver Wolcott 

Vice President: (for two years) Mr. Edward Dane 

Trustees: (for three years) Mr. Albert C. Burrage, Mr. Allen W. Hixon, 
Mr. Walter Hunnewell, Mr. Seth L. Kelsey, Mr. Sargent Wellman. 



Reports of Officers and Committees 

Presented at the Annual Meeting, May 2, 1960 

The Annual Meeting of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society was 
held at Horticultural Hall, Boston, on May 2, 1960 at 3 p.m., with the 
President, Mr. Oliver Wolcott, in the chair. He appointed as tellers Mrs. 
Elizabeth Warriner and Miss Anne Sullivan. 

Mr. Arno H. Nehrling, the Executive Secretary, read the call for the 
meeting. By vote, the reading of the minutes of the previous Annual 
Meeting was waived. The following addresses and reports were read: 




Unusual Daffodil Arrangements exhibited by The Merry's of Dedham, 

at the 1960 Daffodil Show 



8 



I 



The President's Address 

n the face of a disappointing profit on last Spring's Show it reflects 
great credit on the staff and committees of the Society that we 
came out on the right side of the financial picture in 1959. 



I am sorry to report that the loss of members continued; we have 
about 2,000 less than a year ago. However, we think that the tide 
has turned and that the public is realizing that we give full value 
for our dues in Horticulture, the Library, the Spring Show, our 
specialty shows, our lectures and the visit to gardens that have re- 
ceived our awards. 

The improvement in the financial results of Horticulture was 
very marked. For the first time in many years there was no loss but 
instead a small profit. The quality of the magazine continues high, 
both in the content and in its illustrations. 

I think we can all agree that the 1960 Spring Show was a great 
success and I am glad to say that its profits were more than twice 
last year's. We missed the stage of Mechanics Building that permitted 
such spectacular displays, and the balcony of its hall that gave rest 
to weary feet, but the lower stud at Wonderland gave a sense of 
privacy to the gardens that enhanced their effect. I am glad to say 
that we are going back to Wonderland for the 1961 Show, which we 
confidently predict will be even better. 

In closing let me express the thanks of the Society to the Revere 
Racing Association, Inc., for their generosity to the cause of horti- 
culture, and to our committees and our staff led by Mr. Nehrling for 
a most satisfactory year. 

Oliver Wolcott 
President 



9 



Report of the Secretary 

It becomes my privilege as Executive Secretary, to present a resume 
of the activities of the various departments during the past year. The 
interest in all phases of horticulture continues to grow and the requests 
for information from our members, subscribers to Horticulture in 
all parts of the country, as well as the general public, are constantly in- 
creasing. The problems presented are varied and interesting. They often 
present a real challenge, which we meet to the best of our ability. 

The loss in membership during the past two years is of great concern 
to the Officers and members of the staff. In spite of a well organized plan 
for soliciting new members, the results were disappointing. Now an en- 
tirely new approach is being developed by the Membership Committee. 
It includes an attractive invitation and will also carry a strong message 
explaining the advantages of belonging to the Society. The invitations 
will be sent to a carefully selected list of prospects. Many other ways and 
means of obtaining new members are also being considered. If you have 
a helpful idea, please send it to the Chairman of the Committee, and 
be sure to explain the advantages of membership to your friends. 

The report on our magazine, Horticulture, is even more gratify- 
ing than last year. At the present time we have over 90,000 subscribers. 
Most important, however, is the fact that for the first time since we went 
into color, our books show a profit of over $3,000.00 for the year. The 
Publications Committee, as well as the members of the editorial staff, will 
continue to make every effort to keep Horticulture at the head of 
the list of garden magazines. 

In the Library the final stage of the renovation program, developed by 
the Library Committee some years ago, will be completed. Additional 
shelf units, to be delivered and installed this month, will complete the 
equipment of the upper stack room. This will retire the older books from 
the crowded shelves of the reading room and give space for expansion 
over a period of years. 

The courses in practical gardening, which have been given for a num- 
ber of years by Mrs. Lucien B. Taylor, are still very popular. In the future, 
the "Outdoor Practical Gardening Course" will be given in the Spring, 
and the advanced classes in the Fall and Winter months. The courses are 
open to both men and women. 

At the request of a number of garden club members, Mrs. Arthur P. 
Teele again conducted a Spring series of lectures and demonstrations on 
flower arranging. Many of her pupils were interested in entering classes 
at the Spring Flower Show. Mrs. Teele requires all her pupils to join the 
Society. 

Our Spring and Winter series of lectures, sponsored by the Committee 
on Lectures and Publications, created a great deal of interest. The at- 
tendance has never been better, undoubtedly due to the fact that mem- 

10 



Report of the Secretary 

bers may now bring a guest. Dr. Conrad L. Wirth, Director of National 
Parks, drew a capacity audience. 

The decision of the Board to hold the 1960 Spring Flower Show at 
Wonderland Park in Revere was a wise one. The space was used to good 
advantage by our exhibitors, and the location proved ideal, being easy to 
reach by car or the M.T.A. from Boston. Our Show visitors also appre- 
ciated the parking facilities, which take care of 8,000 cars. The plant 
material has never held up so well, many of the gardens looking as fresh 
the last day of the Show as they did on opening day. Over 85,000 people 
were in attendance. I am pleased to report the Show was also a financial 
success. The Committee on Exhibitions has already accepted an invita- 
tion from the Wonderland Park officials to go back there in 1961. 

As in former years, the Society is sponsoring eight Summer and Fall 
shows in our own building. At the urgent request of some of our members, 
the Hemerocallis Show, the newcomer on our schedule, is being continued. 

The Annual Field Trip to the Arnold Arboretum was even more suc- 
cessful than in previous years. The large buses that were available to our 
members made it possible for them to conveniently visit many of the plant 
collections in different sections of the Arboretum. A staff member, includ- 
ing both Dr. Howard and Dr. Wyman, was in charge of each bus and 
gave information and answered questions as the caravan proceeded. The 
same plan was followed this year on our Arnold Arboretum Field Trip, 
which is scheduled to be held Saturday, May 21. 

Visitations to gardens recognized by the Society in previous seasons are 
being continued. The exact dates this year are Friday, May 20, and 
Saturday, May 21. A list of these gardens, with specific directions as to 
how they could be reached, is being mailed to all members. 

Miss Dorothy Manks, our Librarian, and your Secretary, attended the 
Annual Meeting of the American Horticultural Congress in Rochester, New 
York, last Fall. We staged an exhibit depicting the various activities of 
the Society which attracted considerable attention. It was at this meet- 
ing that the American Horticultural Council merged with the American 
Horticultural Society and adopted the latter's name. 

Mr. Phil Clark resigned as Editor of Horticulture to accept a posi- 
tion in Mexico City. I am pleased to announce that Mr. H. Gleason 
Mattoon, who was Assistant Editor, has taken over the Editorship. 

In closing my report, I wish to thank the Trustees, Officers and the 
Chairmen of the various Committees for their wonderful cooperation. My 
sincerest thanks are also extended to the members of the staff for their 
interest and loyalty in the work of the Society. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Arno H. Nehrling 
Executive Secretary 

11 



F 



Report of the Committee on Exhibitions 

-njor the Exhibition Committee and your Chairman in particular, it 
is a pleasure to report on this past year's activities* 

In all, ten flower shows were held by the Horticultural Society. 
It is difficult to say what makes the attendance vary from year to year 
at these shows. It may be because of inclement weather; it may be a 
sudden interest in a particular group of plants or it may be the caprice 
of human nature that accounts for the difference. Whatever the cause, 
those who failed to attend were the losers. The Daffodil Show had a slight 
increase of 84, and the Rose Show a substantial increase of 568. The 
Tulip, Iris, Hemerocallis and the Fall Shows resulted in a decrease of 
2311. This is difficult to understand, especially in the Fall Show, with 
the outstanding display put on by the Boston School Gardens. At the 
Camellia, the Gladiolus and the Children's Shows no attendance was taken. 

I believe I am correct in stating that for the first time in the history of 
Spring Flower Shows, it was held outside the city of Boston. This year it 
was staged at Wonderland Park in Revere. It is a pleasure to report that 
the results were good. While the attendance was not up to the records 
established at Mechanics Building, we feel that for the first year of a new 
venture it was rewarding; both from the numbers who viewed the Show 
as well as from the financial viewpoint. Our attendance totaled 85,575, 
an increase of 28,480 over last year. 

In general, the Spring Flower Show was well received by the public. 
All the exhibits merited praise, but special mention should go to the Wom- 
en's Exhibitions Committee and to the Garden Club Federation of Massa- 
chusetts and their chairmen for the effective way they met and handled 
a challenging situation. Our thanks go to them, too, for helping us to stay 
within our budget, when we were dealing with an unknown cost figure. 

This leads to a comment which I believe is well justified at this meet- 
ing: we had the utmost assistance and cooperation from the officials of 
Wonderland Park. They also were exceptionally fair in their dealings with 
the Horticultural Society, and some of it may be reflected in the fact that 
this year's Show had the lowest cost in many years. 

They have invited us to come back there for next year's Spring Flower 
Show. Many garden exhibitors as well as trade booth exhibitors were very 
pleased with last year's location and will be happy to learn their desire 
to return will be fulfilled. 

The greatest problem is more space, and your committee has already 
given considerable thought and study to the possibility of gaining addi- 
tional area, to accommodate more and larger exhibits, plus more trade 
booths and we hope a good sized spot for a spectacular exhibit which 
needs greater depth and height. Also being considered are wider aisles, 
for easier flow of traffic, better and larger dining facilities and last but 
not least seating and rest areas to accommodate more people. 

The Exhibition Committee realizes that we are in a transition period 
caused by this change of location, but we do want to make the Spring 

12 



Report of the Committee on Exhibitions 

Flower Show the high point of all flower shows in the East. We will try 
to maintain the high quality of exhibits which is a must in this Society, 
but we also wish to increase our attendance by another fifty percent. 

Any success in such a venture as this goes not to any one individual, 
but to the organization behind it. To Mr. Arno Nehrling, Director of Exhi- 
bitions, and his capable staff; to the members of the Exhibition Commit- 
tee; to the Publicity Department and to all the exhibitors who took part 
in the Show, my appreciation for their support, their cooperation and 
their interest. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Harold D. Stevenson, Chairman 
Committee on Exhibitions 



Educational display of Fruits, exhibited by the New York State Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station, Geneva, at the 1959 Harvest and Chry- 
santhemum Show 




13 



Report of the Committee on Children's Gardens 



everyone generally agrees that the weather plays a very important 
-<j part in making a particular season successful or not with respect 
— ^ to children's gardens. The season of 1959 provided quite a variety 



of extremes. May was hot and dry with several 90° days followed by six 
weeks of excessively cool, wet weather. June, usually one of the best grow- 
ing months because of the long days and moderate temperatures, was far 
from perfect. Rainfall for the month totalled over 8.6 inches in the Boston 
area. Twenty-three days were cloudy and only once during the month 
was there a "perfect" June day. From mid- July until Show time, the last 
week in August, the weather was hot and dry with little or no rain and 
more than a dozen days when the mercury rose to 90° or higher. 

This unusual season had no ill effect on the Children's Show, however. 
The final count showed 1307 entries, just a few under the 1958 total. 
The flower classes all provided strong competition, the three zinnia classes 
providing 92 entries. 

The outstanding exhibit of the Children's Show came from the Boston 
Public School Garden at the Cummings Estate in Woburn. Staged by 
the children under the supervision of Miss Catherine M. Maney and her 
assistants, this exhibit was awarded First Prize, the Society's Gold Medal, 
and a Special Medallion from the Massachusetts Department of Agricul- 
ture. 

At the annual Harvest and Chrysanthemum Show, the children and 
staff of the Boston School Garden at Woburn staged a 650 square foot 
display containing many varieties of vegetables. Authorities and visitors 
to the Show agreed it was the best vegetable display staged at Horticul- 
tural Hall in many years. The quality of the exhibit is evidenced by the 
awards given it— First Prize, a Gold Medal and a Cultural Certificate for 
the sixth successive year in adult competition. Let me remind you that 
this is a fine example of what children can do with the proper instruc- 
tion and guidance. 

The children also staged a 50 square foot Gourd Exhibit which was 
awarded First Prize. Individual plate entries in vegetable classes won 
about 30 prizes. 

Students from the Jamaica Plain High School and the Norfolk County 
Agricultural High School, under the guidance of their instructors, staged 
an excellent combined exhibit at the 1959 New England Spring Flower 
Show. It was awarded first prize and also given an award from the State 
Department of Agriculture. Here juniors were again participating with 
adults in the greatest horticultural show of the Northeast. 

The 4-H Club Section filled the upper hall at the Children's Show. 
Most of the exhibitors in this section were from the eastern and south- 
eastern sections of Massachusetts. Quality was excellent and competi- 
tion very keen. 

14 



Report of the Committee on Children's Gardens 

Thanks to the Massachusetts Horticultural Society and its staff, the 
many garden teachers and supervisors, the 4-H leaders and the Massa- 
chusetts Department of Agriculture, 1959 was a most successful year for 
the young people of the Commonwealth interested in gardening and hor- 
ticulture. 

Henry G. Wendler 

for the 

Committee on Children's Gardens 




Fall display of Vegetables exhibited by the children of the Boston School 
Garden, Woburn, at the 1959 Harvest and Chrysanthemum Show 

15 



Report of Committee on Library for 1959 

When we survey the year's record for the Library, the use made of 
it and the people who use it tell many important things. Among 
our borrowers and correspondents are many home gardeners, of 
course. There are also club officers with problems of club management, 
program making and the staging of flower shows. We serve professional 
landscape architects, nurserymen and specialty growers, staff members of 
experiment stations and agricultural colleges, authors, artists, college and 
high school students. Geographically, we count among our regular patrons 
members in California, Oregon, Kentucky, Wisconsin, as well as in the 
Pennsylvania-New York-New England area. 

The requests are as varied as the readers. Many home gardeners are 
working out plans for landscaping small suburban properties. High school 
students have assignments for projects in science, often fairly technical 
ones. For the American Peony Society we compiled a full list of named 
and registered peony varieties. The Director and the Librarian of a new 
mid- west arboretum came to talk over problems of library administration. 
The Garden Club Federation was given a table of books for a conference 
on work with juniors. 

The library loaned 4,138 books in 1959. Many letters were written. The 
reading room was open each evening of major flower shows and the winter 
and spring lecture series. 

In addition to books, we receive nearly 300 magazines and society re- 
ports, 71 of them from foreign countries. We have good, up-to-date files 
of bulletins from the state agricultural departments and experiment sta- 
tions, and from the United States Department of Agriculture. Our collec- 
tion of nursery catalogues, both American and foreign, is large. Garden 
clubs all over the country are represented in our files of club yearbooks, 
and any club in the country may borrow them for help in their own work. 

The show case in the reading room usually displays something inter- 
esting. For the Herb Society of America and the American Carnation So- 
ciety we prepared exhibits to observe their respective annual meetings. 
Earlier in the year we were indebted to one of our members, Mrs. Andrew 
Simoni, for a lovely exhibit of prints of lilies from her own fine collection, 
and we would be delighted to make the case available to other organiza- 
tions and private collectors. 

As many of you know, we were privileged for many years to have a 
skilled binder who took care of our treasure collection. After her death, 
the Library Committee spent more than a year looking for someone quali- 
fied to take her place. We have now chosen two firms, one in Boston and 
one in New York, who are specialists in the care of old and fine bindings, 
and the books in the treasure room will soon be in excellent shape. 

16 



Report of Committee on Library 

During 1959 there was a pause in the library's long-term renovation 
plan. This year new stack shelving is being installed, and this will relieve 
the crowding of the shelves in the reading room and provide space for 
growth for a long time to come. 



Respectfully submitted, 



Albert C. Burrage, Chairman 
Committee on the Library 




Educational displays similar to this are frequently set up by the Library, 
from its store of rare books and fine prints 



17 




Report of the Committee on Prizes 

n behalf of the Society, the Committee on Prizes gratefully ac- 
knowledges its indebtedness to an increasing number of compe- 
tent horticulturists who have served willingly and well as judges 
in the several shows of the past year. Continuing expressions of satisfac- 
tion and appreciation of their work from both the public and the exhibi- 
tors indicate that the Society's high standards in this field are properly 
sustained. 

This Committee believes that there has been generally favorable ac- 
ceptance of its policy of increasing the use and appreciation of the silver 
and bronze medals as distinct honors when awarded to worthy exhibits, 
thus still further enhancing the high honor intended to be conveyed by an 
award of a gold medal. 

The outstanding success of the 1960 Spring Show is clear proof, if any 
be needed, that there is an ever-increasing appreciation of the inspiration 
and beauty that flowers and plants provide, indoors and out. Many ob- 
servers liked the more nearly uniform sizes of the several garden exhibits, 
with their appeal as something within the scope of their own aspirations. 
In this respect the educational impact of the Show was greater than ever, 
with the quality of exhibits high, acting as a real challenge to the judges. 

Considerable interest was shown in the display cards used by some ex- 
hibitors to set forth briefly the theme of those exhibits, and this Commit- 
tee feels this practice may well be further encouraged. 

Several suggestions came from various sources and are herewith pre- 
sented for such consideration as they may merit: 

1. That simple critiques and pertinent comments reflecting the judges' 
thinking on each garden exhibit be submitted by the judges, typed on 
small cards, and posted on the exhibits. 

2. That the total-point score of each exhibit, as determined by the offi- 
cial judging, be displayed on each exhibit card, as educational information 
for the observer and as justifiable credit to the exhibitor. For example, 
because there is seldom more than one entry in a garden exhibit class, 
and all exhibitors are equally qualified to earn the first prize blue ribbon, 
the posting of total-point scores would give opportunity for fair indica- 
tions of relative merit. 

3. That, if and when space and other factors make it feasible, more 
than one entry in a class of garden exhibits be invited, so that different 
interpretations and varying skills may be demonstrated in fair competition. 

4. That overhead cards showing the identification numbers of the ex- 
hibits corresponding to those in the published Show program be conspicu- 
ously posted, so that all observers can quickly and easily identify each 
exhibit as they approach it. 

5. That each exhibitor be requested to designate, when he submits his 
official entry application, the particular scale of points, as published in the 
Rule Book, which he believes best applies to the exhibit he proposes to 
make. 

18 



Report of the Committee on Prizes 

This Committee believes that with some modifications each of the above 
suggestions has merit, and may well be in the interest of the exhibitors, the 
public and the judges. 

Along with the general enthusiasm for the spectacular Spring Flower 
Shows, there should be accorded high praise to the several specialized 
shows throughout the year, for which the Society is justly noted. Though 
necessarily smaller in scope, these shows are invariably well presented, 
with real educational value and esthetic appeal. Many exhibits at these 
shows deserve the most competent judging, and merit high awards. 

As always, the Committee on Prizes is grateful for the unfailing coopera- 
tion and support of the Officers and Trustees of the Society, the Com- 
mittee on Exhibitions, and especially of the Executive Secretary, Mr. Nehr- 
ling, and his very competent staff. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Milford R. Lawrence, Chairman 
Committee on Prizes 



The Albert C. Burrage 




Gold Vase 

The Albert C. Burrage Gold 
Vase, America's most coveted 
flower show trophy, was pre- 
sented to Mr. Marinus Vander 
Pol, Fairhaven, Massachusetts, 
by the Massachusetts Horticul- 
tural Society. This outstanding 
award was presented to Mr. Van- 
der Pol for creating the outstand- 
ing Japanese garden exhibit fea- 
turing tree peonies at the 1959 
New England Spring Flower 
Show. 



19 



Special Medal Awards 



The George Robert White 
Medal of Honor 

To Dr. H. Harold Hume, 
Gainesville, Florida, retired Pro- 
vost and Dean of the University 
of Florida College of Agriculture, 
a distinguished author of notable 
horticultural books, and general- 
ly credited with having advanced 
horticulture in the South more 
than any other individual on 
record. 




Henry Teuscher 

The Jackson Dawson Medal 

To Dr. Karl Sax, Jamaica 
Plain, Massachusetts, retired, for- 
merly Professor of Botany at 
Harvard from 1935 to 1959, for- 
mer Director of the Arnold Ar- 
boretum, author, lecturer and a 
plant breeder of note, for skill 
in the science and practice of hy- 
bridization and propagation of 
hardy woody plants. 




Dr. H. Harold Hume 

The Thomas Roland Medal 

To Henry Teuscher, Montreal, 
Canada, the father of the Mon- 
treal Botanical Garden and its 
present curator, a very able and 
distinguished horticulturist and 
author, for exceptional skill in 
horticulture. 





Dr. Karl Sax 



20 



Special Medal Awards 



The Society's 
Large Gold Medal 

To George W. Peyton of Rapi- 
dan, Virginia, without any 
doubt, or challenge, the greatest 
living authority on herbaceous 
peonies, as well as being a living 
encyclopedia on most any horti- 
cultural subject, his interests 
having been legion. He is a man 
of great stature in the peony 
world. 



The Society s Scroll 

Awarded to the City of Boston 
Public School Department, in 
recognition of outstanding serv- 
ices rendered in making the Bos- 
ton Public School Garden Pro- 
gram the finest and most compre- 
hensive in the United States. 




George W. Peyton 



Henry G. Wendler 



The Society's Silver Medal 

To Henry G. Wendler of Alls- 
ton, for many years an enthusi- 
astic and outstanding teacher at 
Jamaica Plain High School. 
Since September 1, 1958 he has 
been Head of the Agricultural 
Department at this School, and 
more than anyone else has been 
the guiding hand and inspiring 
influence behind the School Gar- 
den Program of the City of Bos- 
ton, and largely responsible for 
the wonderful School Garden 
Exhibits annually staged at our 
Fall Flower Shows. 




21 



Garden Committee Awards 

The Board of Trustees awarded the following medals on the recommen- 
dation of the Committee on Gardens, Dr. Donald Wyman, Chairman. 

The Society's Gold Medal 

To Mr. and Mrs. R. L. Henderson, Brookline. Situated on a hilltop in 
the closely-built town of Brookline with a view to the distant Blue Hills, 
these plantings emphasize the comforts of quiet country living away from 
the hustle of city traffic. A Japanese garden, iris garden, rose garden, a 
small orchard and vegetable garden, a rock garden featuring yellow and 
blue-flowering plants, and a beautiful white garden, all surrounded with 
a rail fence for rural atmosphere. Majestic century-old oaks and beeches 
combine with younger plants to produce an excellent combination of the 
old and the new. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Poorvu, Newton. This garden is living proof 
that a restful situation can be created by intelligent planning even among 
crowded properties. A Russian olive tree with its gray-green foliage adds 
materially to the over all effect of coolness. A pool with running water, 




■:■■::.: ' .;;■; ■;..;;;; ■ : 



Garden of Mr. and Mrs. R. L. Henderson, Brookline 
Awarded a Gold Medal 



22 



Garden Committee Awards 

restful patios, and a birch woods that has been opened just enough to 
allow a beautiful grass lawn underneath, gives the garden an unexpected 
cool and restful privacy. 

The Society's Silver Medal 

To Beth Israel Hospital, Boston. A dignified, interesting planting, with 
laburnums, crab apples, fastigiate white pines, and roses for summer 
flowers, where particular attention has been given to the selection of 
plants for a colorful display throughout the entire year. It is most pleas- 
ing and restful to see such a colorful combination of plant materials 
moulded into a beautiful yet practical planting in front of a busy metro- 
politan hospital. 

To Mr. and Mrs. C. Chandler Parkhurst, Winchester. Bordered by a 
very busy highway, the background planting shields this small property 
completely. Clipped hemlocks on one side, clipped arborvitaes on the 
other, give a much-needed feeling of privacy in this closely-built area. 
A double waterfall, interesting tool house and patio at the rear of the 
garage, have been worked well into this simple but restful planting where 
the owners enjoy doing all the work themselves. 




Garden of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Poorvu, 
Awarded a Gold Medal 



Newton 



23 



Garden Committee Awards 

The Society's Bronze Medal 

To Mr. and Mrs. Meyer Reisman, Newton. A small garden in a closely 
built-up area, where large shrubs have been planted along the edges of 
the property to hide closely abutting houses. A wisteria chain across part 
of the garden lends interest to the steep, hilly planting close by, and a 
small overlook at the level of the rooftop of the neighboring house gives 
proof that a beautiful garden can be made in very difficult terrain. 

The Society's Garden Certificate 

To Mr. Walter Knight, Belmont. A small and beautiful garden on for- 
mer farm land, featuring a 100 year old apple tree, with stepped arbor- 
vitae screen hedge on either side of the property, and all plantings care- 
fully mulched, clearly demonstrates the considerate care and horticultural 
knowledge of its owner. 

To the J. W. Greer Company, Wilmington. A foundation planting about 
a small manufacturing plant where the careful selection of plants in the 
proper scale has produced a pleasing result. 

To the Town of Reading. A commendable attempt to disguise the un- 
sightly Town Dump from a very busy highway by a screen planting of 
spruce and lilacs. 




Beth Israel Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 
Awarded a Silver Medal 



2A 



Garden Committee Awards 




Garden of Mr. and Mrs. Meyer Reisman, Newton 
Awarded a Bronze Medal 




Garden of Mr. Walter Knight, Belmont 
Awarded a Garden Certificate 



25 



Garden Committee Awards 




i^^K^^^M^^&^^^^^S^P 



Garden of Mr. and Mrs. C. Chandler Parkhurst, Winchester 
Awarded a Silver Medal 




Town of Reading, Massachusetts, Town Dump 
Awarded a Garden Certificate 




J. W. Greer Company, Wilmington, Massachusetts 
Awarded a Garden Certificate 

26 



Medals and Certificates Awarded in 1959 

The Albert C. Burrage Gold Vase 

Mr. Marinus Vander Pol, Fairhaven, for a Japanese garden, the most 
outstanding exhibit in 1959. 

George Robert White Medal of Honor 

Dr. H. Harold Hume, Gainesville, Florida, for eminent service in horti- 
culture. 



Thomas Roland Medal 

Mr. Henry Teuscher, Montreal, Canada, for exceptional skill in horti- 
culture. 



Jackson Dawson Medal 

Dr. Karl Sax, Jamaica Plain, for his contributions to the science of plan; 
propagation. 

Gold Medals of the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

Cider Hill Greenhouses, for a group of Saintpaulias at the 1960 Spring 
Show 

Mr. and Mrs. R. L. Henderson, Brookline, for a garden emphasizing 
country living. 

Mr. George W. Peyton, Rapidan, Virginia, the greatest living authority 
on herbaceous peonies. 

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Poorvu, Newton, for a cool and restful garden. 

Silver Medals of the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

Beth Israel Hospital, Boston, for a dignified and interesting planting. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. Chandler Parkhurst, Winchester, for a simple and rest- 
ful planting. 

Mr. Henry G. Wendler, Allston, for his work with the Boston Public School 
Garden Program. 

Bronze Medal of the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

Mr. and Mrs. Meyer Reisman, Newton, for a garden in difficult terrain, 

27 



Medals and Certificates 

Garden Certificates of the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

J. W. Greer Company, Wilmington, for a foundation planting about a 

small manufacturing plant. 
Mr. Walter Knight, Belmont, for a small and beautiful garden on former 

farm land. 
Town of Reading, for a commendable attempt to disguise the unsightly 

Town Dump by a screen planting of spruce and lilacs. 

Scroll of the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

City of Boston Public School Department, for conducting school gardens 
in the City of Boston. 

The President's Cup 

Alexander I. Heimlich, Woburn, for a colorful alpine wall garden, the 
most meritorious exhibit in the Spring Show. 

Gold Medal of the 
Horticultural Society of New York 

National Association of Gardeners, Boston Branch, for an informal plant- 
ing, the most beautiful exhibit in the Spring Show. 

Gold Medal Certificate of the 
Pennsylvania Horticultural Society 

National Association of Gardeners, Cape Cod Branch, for a semi-formal 
June garden, an exhibit of special merit which stimulates an interest 
in horticulture in the Spring Show. 

Beacon Hill Garden Club Cup 

North Shore Garden Club, for a kitchen and herb garden, the most 
charming garden club exhibit in the Spring Show. 

Mrs. John S. Ames Cup 

Cambridge Plant Club, for the exhibit in the Garden Club Section dis- 
playing the greatest horticultural excellence at the Spring Show. 

The Antoine Leuthy Prize 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Stone, Marion, for a group of acacias at the 
Spring Show. 

28 



Medals and Certificates 

Trophy of the 
Massachusetts Department of Agriculture 

Weston Nurseries, Hopkinton, for a formal plaza garden at the Spring 
Show. 

Bulkley Medal of the Garden Club of America 

Marinus Vander Pol, Fairhaven, for a Japanese garden at the Spring Show, 
with special commendation for the creative vision and fine execution 
demonstrated by Allen Haskell. 

The Beatrix Far rand Silver Bowl 

Cherry Hill Nurseries, West Newbury, for Kaempferi azaleas, the best 
exhibit of azaleas or rhododendrons in the Spring Show. 

John Taylor Arms Award 

Mrs. Lazarus Ogus, Sisterhood Garden Club of Winthrop, for the blue 
ribbon entry receiving the highest number of points at the Spring 
Flower Show. 



Best Blooms 

Camellia Lady Clare, exhibited by Mrs. Edwin T. Green, Cambridge. 

Daffodil Agra, exhibited by Mrs. Edwin S. Webster, Chestnut Hill. 

HemerocaHis Ribbed Trim, exhibited by The Merrys, Needham. 

Iris Thotmes III, exhibited by Kenneth Stone, Ashby. 

Tulip Marshal Haig, exhibited by The First Church of Christ, Scientist, 
Boston. 

Gold Medals 

Lewis Alfuso, for a display of chrysanthemum arrangements. 

American Iris Society, Region I, for flower arrangement section. 

Arthur Arenius, for the most meritorious exhibit in the Gladiolus Show. 

Associated Fruit Growers of Eastern Massachusetts, for an educational 
apple exhibit. 

Bartlett Gardens, for a chrysanthemum garden. 

Boston Market Gardeners Association, for an educational vegetable ex- 
hibit. 

Boston Public School Garden at Woburn, for a display of vegetables and 
flowers. 

29 



Medals and Certificates 

Boston Public School Garden at Woburn, for a display of vegetables from 
a school garden. 

Breck's, for an informal garden at the Spring Show. 

Butler & Ullman, Inc., for a display of camellias. r 

F. I. Carter & Sons, for an educational exhibit of cacti and succulents, 
at the Spring Show. 

Cider Hill Greenhouses, York, Maine, for a group of saintpaulias at the 
Spring Show. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Dane, for a group of odontoglossums at the Spring 
Show. 

Mrs. Richard E. Danielson, for a group of flowering plants at the Spring 
Show. 

Fishelson, Florist, for a flower market at the Spring Show. 

Garden Club Federation of Massachusetts (Mrs. Neil M. MacLaren, 
Chairman), for a group of flower arrangements based on the theme 
"Spring Sets the Tempo," at the Spring Show. 

Garden Club Federation of Massachusetts (Mrs. Robert Richards, Chair- 
man), for the flower arrangement section of the Rose Show. 

Gardner Museum, for a. group of amaryllis at the Spring Show. 

Alexander I. Heimlich, for a chrysanthemum garden. 

Alexander I. Heimlich, for a colorful alpine wall garden at the Spring 
Show. 

Huntingdon Valley Garden Club (at Philadelphia), for a section of a 
garden using a sculpture piece as the center of interest, at the Spring 
Show. 

Johnson Brothers, for a display of roses at the Spring Show. 

Massachusetts Horticultural Society Women's Exhibitions Committee 
(Miss Rachael Warner, Chairman), for a series of small gardens at the 
Spring Show. 

National Association of Gardeners, Boston Branch, for an informal plant- 
ing at the Spring Show. 

National Association of Gardeners, Cape Cod Branch, for a semi-formal 
June garden at the Spring Show. 

New England Carnation Growers' Association, for a display of carna- 
tions at the Spring Show. 

New York Botanical Garden (at New York), for their exhibit at the 
Spring Show. 

Pine Gardens, for a spring garden at the Spring Show. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Stone, for a group of acacias at the Spring Show. 

Marinus Vander Pol, for a Japanese garden at the Spring Show. 

Mrs. Edwin S. Webster, for a group of orchids at the Spring Show. 

Weston Nurseries, for a formal plaza garden at the Spring Show. ,. 

30 



Medals and Certificates 

Silver Medals 

Mr. and Mrs. Cameron Bradley, for a display of camellias. 

Breck's, for a display of tulips. 

Mr. and Mrs. Stedman Buttrick, for a display of hemerocallis. 

Cherry Hill Nurseries, for an intimate garden of azaleas and rhododen- 
drons at the Spring Show. 

Flower Arrangement Section (Mrs. Percy I. Merry, Chairman), for a 
group of flower arrangements based on the theme "Glory of Autumn." 

Gardeners' and Florists' Club of Boston, for an informal garden at the 
Spring Show. 

The Merrys, for a display of daffodils. 

New York State Agricultural Experiment Station, Geneva, New York, 
for an educational fruit exhibit. 

North Shore Horticultural Society, for an informal terrace garden at the 
Spring Show. 

Old Colony Landscape Service Co., for an informal spring garden at 
the Spring Show. 

Park Florist, for a display of chrysanthemum arrangements. 
Pine Gardens, for a garden of hardy chrysanthemums. 
Rosander & Sons, for a display of roses. 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis P. Sears, for a group of flowering plants at the 
Spring Show. 

George L. Slate, Geneva, New York (at N.A.L.S. Show), for lily 

Brocade. 
Pasquale Vasaturo, for a display of miniature gladiolus. 

Wellesley College, Botany Department, for an educational exhibit at the 
Spring Show. 

Bronze Medals 

Arrowhead Gardens, for a display of cut flower arrangements at the 

Spring Show. 
Karl P. Jones, for a display of roses. 
Mrs. Eugene Lamme, for a collection of hybrid lilacs. 
Park Florist, for a display of cut flower arrangements at the Spring Show. 
John Thibodeau, for a display of miniature bulbs. 

Awards of Merit 

Rose Seventeen, exhibited by Peirce Brothers. 

31 



Medals and Certificates 

Votes of Commendation 

Carex Morrowi, exhibited by Bay State Nurseries. 

Hedera Helix, 238th Street, exhibited by Bay State Nurseries. 

Narcissus Triandrus, exhibited by John Thibodeau. 

Cultural Certificates 

Arnold Arboretum, for a corner of a bonsai garden at the Spring Show. 

Fred Armstrong, for a group of begonias. 

Boston Public School Garden at Woburn, for a display of vegetables 

from a school garden. 
Herbert Branch, for a display of daffodils. 
Peter Cacciola, for cyclamen at the Spring Show. 
Albert Hulley, for clematis at the Spring Show. 
Johnson Brothers, for a display of stephanotis. 
Stewart Johnson, for a group of cypripediums. 
Everett Mann, for anthurium plants at the Spring Show. 
Edna Roberts, York, Maine, for Saintpaulias at the Spring Show. 
John Sullivan, for an exhibit of new primula polyanthus at the Spring 

Show. 
John Sullivan, for a group of amaryllis at the Spring Show. 




Albert C. Burrage, left, presenting the Burrage Gold Vase to Marinus 
Vander Pol, Fairhaven, Massachusetts 



32 




Mrs. Edwin S. Webster, left, presenting the Bulkley Medal of the Garden 

Club of America to William Jennings, Wellesley College, for a Fern 

display at the 1960 Spring Show 




Dr. Karl Sax, right, Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts, accepting the Jackson 
Dawson Medal from Oliver Wolcott 



33 




Dr. Donald Wyman, left, presenting the Gold Medal to Mr. Robert 
Henderson, Brookline, Massachusetts 




Henry G. Wendler, Allston, Massachusetts, right, accepting the Silver 

Medal from Oliver Wolcott 



34 



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Dr. Donald Wyman, left, presenting the Silver Medal to Mrs. C. Chandler 
Parkhurst, Winchester, Massachusetts 




Dr. Donald Wyman, left, presenting the Gold Medal to Mrs. Samuel 
Poorvu, Newton, Massachusetts 



35 



Medals and Certificates 




Dr. Donald Wyman, left, presenting the Silver Medal to Mrs. S. Robert 
Stone, who accepted the award for the Beth Israel Hospital, Boston 




Oliver Wolcott, left, presenting the Scroll to Mr. Thomas Roche of the 
Boston Public School Industrial Arts Department 



36 



Report of the Treasurer 
For the Year Ended December 31, 1959 

Mr. president, Ladies and Gentlemen, the operation of your Soci- 
ety for the year 1959 showed a profit of $2,947 compared to a 
deficit of $12,567 for the year 1958. In view of the fact that the 
profit from the 1959 Spring Show was $16,318 compared to $28,156 in 
1958, it is evident that the expenses of the Society were carefully con- 
trolled in order to keep the Society out of the red for the year. It also 
should be mentioned that our magazine, Horticulture, showed a profit 
of $3,248 in 1959 compared to a deficit of $1,336 in 1958. The financial 
record of Horticulture in 1959 is even more commendable when you re- 
call that the magazine lost $33,179 in 1957. 

On the negative side it should be pointed out that membership income 
declined to $45,929 in 1959 from $49,959 in 1958. Furthermore, there 
were no major building expenses in 1959 compared to about $7,000 in 
1958. However, major repairs and maintenance to our building cannot 
be put off indefinitely, and considering the age of our property, undoubt- 
edly substantial building expenses will be incurred in the future. Never- 
theless, despite the problems and difficulties the Society will have to face, 
our financial condition is good. Our investment income continues to in- 
crease and as a result of the untiring efforts of Mr. Nehrling and his 
staff, most of the departments of the Society are operating at or very 
close to a profit. 

The complete audit report of the Society for the year 1959 as pre- 
pared by our auditors, Brown, Holdridge & Company, is available to our 
members who might be interested in a more detailed analysis of the 
figures. 



Respectfully submitted, 



Oliver F. Ames 
Assistant Treasurer 




37 



Statement of Financial Condition at December 31, 1959 

ASSETS 

Cash in Banks and On Hand $ 25,337.99 

Accounts Receivable— Horticulture 19,897.83 

Accounts Receivable $ 22,497.83 

Deduct: Allowance for losses in Coll 2,600.00 

$ 19,897.83 

Accounts Receivable Other 540.14 

Investments at Book Value . . , 799,873.89 

Eleanor Tudor Trust 7,942.50 

Capital Assets 606,195.92 

Real Estate . $498,564.63 

Improvements and Additions to Building . 61,050.82 
Library 46,580.47 

$606,195.92 

Deferred Charges 16,984.45 

Spring Show, 1960 $ 451.77 

Prepaid Insurance and Expense . 7,546.96 

Inventory of Books, Binders, etc . 8,985.72 



16,984.45 



LIABILITIES and CAPITAL FUNDS 



$1,476,772.72 



Liabilities $ 38,350.27 

Accounts Payable $ 31,512.46 

Taxes Withheld 2,553.05 

Accrued Commissions— Horticulture .. 2,931.10 

Social Security Taxes Accrued 223.46 

Credit Balances Accounts Receivable .... 875.20 

Deposits on Rentals 255.00 

$ 38,350.27 

Eleanor Tudor Trust Fund 8,428.71 

Principal $ 7,942.50 

Unexpended Income 486.21 

$ 8,428.71 

i — 

Sundry Funds 860,660.11 

Special Uses: 

Principal $242,118.84 

Unexpended Income .. . 11,114.94 $253,233.78 

38 



General Uses: 

Principal 607,426.33 

$860,660.11 

Capital 564,524.70 

Surplus (Capital) . .' 144,687.92 

Deficit (139,878.99) 

$1,476,772.72 

Statement of Income and Expenditures 
INCOME 

1959 1958 

Income from Investments $ 71,664.94 $ 70,143.06 

Membership Fees (after member's subscrip- 
tion to Horticulture) 45,927.79 49,959.47 

Rentals 15,375.96 11,386.62 

Spring Show 36,953.72 68,559.53 

Autumn Show ( 2,974.86) ( 3,237.50) 

Horticulture Profit or Loss 3,248.12 ( 1,336.43) 

Other Receipts 3,110.00 2,986.83 

$173,305.67 $198,461.58 

EXPENDITURES 

Building Expenses $ 41,667.21 $ 44,152.40 

Library Expenses 17,155.16 14,465.42 

Office and General Salaries and Expenses . . 76,261.03 95,434.01 

Awards, Lectures, Medals and Certificates: 

Lectures paid from General Funds 1,621.48 1,211.85 

Prizes, Medals, and Certificates paid from 

General Funds : 2,085.36 3,796.38 

Prizes, Medals, and Certificates paid from 

Spring Show 20,636.05 40,402.75 

Medals, Lectures, etc. paid from Restricted 

Funds 2,451.04 880.00 

Awards at Shows paid from Restricted 

Funds 3,814.91 3,403.51 

Miscellaneous Exhibition Expenses 3,560.10 4,497.44 

$169,252.34 $208,243.76 

Net Profit or (Loss) -All Funds $ 4,053.33 $( 9,872.18) 

Elimination of Expenses Included Above 

Paid From Income of Restricted Funds . .$ 8,131.87 $ 6,578.80 

$ 12,185.20 $( 3,203.38) 
Elimination of Income Included Above Allo- 
cated to Restricted Funds $ 9,238.06 $ 9,363.66 

Net Profit or ( Loss ) -General Funds $ 2,947.14 $(12,567.04) 

39 




Arrangement of Gladiolus at the 1960 Spring Show, 
by Mrs. Ransom Rowe, Dover 

Awarded the John Taylor Arms Award 



40 



Books Added to the Library 

May 1, 1959— May I, 1960 

Gardening 

Audus, L. J. Plant growth substances; 2d ed. New York, 1959 
Beadle, D. W. Canadian fruit, flower, and kitchen gardener. Montreal, 

1872 
Bentley, Maxwell. Commercial hydroponics. Johannesburg, 1959 
Doolittle, R. & Tiedebohl, H. Southwest gardening; rev. ed. Albuquer- 
que, N. M., 1959 

Farrington, E. I. The gardener's almanac; revised by George Taloumis. 
Boston, 1960 

Ford Motor Co. The Ford almanac, 1960; ed. by John Strohm. New 
York. 1959 

Genders, Roy. Gardening in miniature. London, 1958 
Hall, C. V. Horticulture laboratory manual. Minneapolis, 1957 
Hancock, J. E. The school garden. London, 1955-59. 2 vols. 
Hardy, J. & Fosman, S. A textbook of gardening for schools and stu- 
dents; 7th ed., rev. London, 1959 
Harler, A. W. The garden in the plains; 3d ed. Madras, India, 1948 
Spice, H. R. Polythene film in horticulture. London, 1959 

Stodola, F. H. Source book on gibberellin, 1828-1957. Peoria, 111., 
1959 

Strohm, John, ed. The Golden garden guide. New York, 1960 

Propagation and Pruning 

Brooklyn Botanic Garden. Pruning handbook. Brooklyn, N. Y., 1958 

Fogg, H. G. W. Growing pot plants from seed. London, 1959 

Gardiner, G. F. Pictorial plant propagation. London, 1957 

Hartmann, H. T. Plant propagation. Englewood Cliffs, N. J., 1959 

Hills, L. D. The propagation of alpines; new and enl. ed. London, 
1959 

Prockter, N. J. Simple propagation; rev. ed. London, 1958 

History of Gardening 

Krutch, J. W., ed. The gardener's world. New York, 1959 
Li, H. L. The garden flowers of China. New York, 1959 

41 



Books Added to the Library 
Auxiliary Sciences 

Soils 

Food and Agriculture Organization of the U.N. Efficient use of ferti- 
lizers; rev. and enl. ed. New York, 1958 
Maunsell, J. E. B. Natural gardening. London, 1958 
Shewell-Cooper, W. E. The A. B. C. of soils. London, 1959 

Diseases and Pests v 

Frear, D. E. H. Pesticide handbook, 1959. State College, Pa;, 1958 
Pirone, P. P. and others. Diseases and pests of ornamental plants; 3d 

ed. New York, 1960 
Plant pathology, problems and progress, 1908-1958. Madison, Wise, 

1959 



Gardening With Ornamental Plants 

Ashberry, Anne. Miniature trees and shrubs. London, 1958 
Barker, Frank. The cream of alpines. London, 1958 
Beale, J. H. The evergreens. New York, 1960 
Bloom, Alan. Perennials for trouble-free gardening. London, 1960 
Fogg, H. G. W. The book of bulbous plants. London, 1957 
Fogg, H. G. W. Growing cut flowers in your garden. London, 1959 
Genders, Roy. Covering a wall. London, 1957 

General Bulb Growers Society of Haarlem. A tentative list of hyacinths 
and other bulbous and tuberous-rooted plants. Haarlem, The Nether- 
lands, 1958 
Hellyer, A. G. L. Garden plants in colour. London, 1959 
Howard, Frances. Landscaping with vines. New York, 1959 
Huxley, A. J., trans. Treasures of the garden; tr. and adapted from 

"Belles fleurs de nos jardins". New York, 1959 
Janes, E. R. Flower-growing for shows. Harmondsworth, Eng., 1959 
Japanese fruit and flower studies. 19—? 

Kobayashi, Norio. Bonsai— miniature potted trees; 8th ed. Tokyo, 1959 
Mclnerny, D. & Gerard, G. All about tropical fish. New York, 1959 
National Shade Tree Conference & National Arborists' Ass'n. Trans- 
planting of trees and shrubs in the northeastern and north central 
United States; rev. Wooster, O., 1958 
Potter, C. H. Have you tried perennials? Chicago, 1959 
Roper, Lanning. Hardy herbaceous plants. London, 1960 
Scharff, Robert. The book of planters. New York, 1960 
Sunset Magazine. Gardening in containers. Menlo Park, Cal., 1959 
Vilmorin, R. de. Plantes alpines dans les jardins. Paris, 1958 
Wells, A. L. Garden ponds, fish and fountains: rev. ed. London, 1959 

42 



Books Added to the Library 

Greenhouse and house plants 

Better Homes & Gardens. House plants for the indoor gardener. Des 

Moines, 1959 
Corbett, W. Commercial production of pot plants. London, 1959 
Graf, A. B. Exotica II. Rutherford, N. J., 1959 
Muller-Idzerda, A. C. 100 indoor plants, their care and cultivation. 

London, 1959 
Robinson, G. W. The cool greenhouse. Harmondsworth, Eng., 1959 
Schulz, Peggie. How to make money from your home greenhouse. 

New York, 1959 
Selsam, M. E. How to grow house plants. New York, 1960 
Van Alphen, Corry. The effective use of house plants. New York, 1959 
Wood, J. P. Greenhouse management. London, 1959 

Monographs 

Adachi, Choka. Camellia, its appreciation and artistic arrangement. 

Tokyo, 1960 
American Camellia Society. American camellia yearbook, 1958-1959. 

Gainesville, Fla., 1958-59 
American Rose Society. American rose annual, 1960. Columbus, O., 

1960 
Bartrum, Douglas. Hydrangeas and viburnums. London, 1958 
Bertrand, A. Succulent plants other than cacti; 2d ed. London, 1959 
Boer, A. F. den. Ornamental crab apples. Wash., D. C, 1959 
Brumbach, W. C. The romance of daffodils. New York, 1959 
Carleton, R. M. Your lawn— how to make it and keep it. New York. 

1959 
Cave, N. L. The iris; 2d ed. London, 1959 
Cave, N. L. Irises for everyone. London, 1960 
Chidamian, Claude. Camellias for everyone. New York, 1959 
Crook, H. C. Campanulas and bellflowers in cultivation. London, 1959 
Edwards, J. P. How to grow roses; 2d ed. Menlo Park, CaL, 1960 
Fennell, T. A. Orchids for home and garden; new ed. New York, 1959 
Fletcher, H. R., comp. The international rhododendron register. Lon- 
don, 1958 
Genders, Roy. Auriculas. London, 1958 
Genders, Roy. Fansies, violas and violets. London, 1958 
Genders, Roy. The polyanthus for garden, exhibition and market. Lon- 
don, 1958 
Genders, Roy. Primroses. London, 1959 
Genders, Roy. Roses. London, 1959 
General Bulb Growers Society of Haarlem. A classified list of tulip names. 

Haarlem, The Netherlands, 1958 
Gordon, Jean. Immortal roses. Woodstock, Vt., 1959 

43 



Books Added to the Library 

Harvey, N. P. The rose in Britain; 4th ed. London, 1958 
Haworth-Booth, M. The hydrangeas; 3d ed. rev. and enl. London, 

1959 
Lamb, Edgar. The illustrated reference on cacti and other succulents, 

vol. 2. London, 1959 
Laren, A. J. van. Succulents other than cacti; 2d ed. Los Angeles, 

1934 
McKenzie, W. F. Freesias. London, 1957 
Marsden, Cyril. Grow cacti; 2d ed., enl. London, 1958 
Marsden, Cyril. Mammillaria. London, 1957 
Matho, Karl. Orchid growing for everyone. London, 1958 
Mulligan, B. O. Maples cultivated in the United States and Canada. 

Seatde, Wash., 1958 
Nehrling, Arno & Irene. Peonies, outdoors and in. New York, 1960 
New England Gladiolus Society. The gladiolus, 1960. Boston, 1960 
Puttock, A. G. The hydrangea. London, 1958 
Puttock, A. G. Lovely fuchsias. London, 1959 
Rector, Carolyn. The African violet variety list for 1960. San Pedro, 

Cal., 1960 
Royal Horticultural Society. Classified list and international register of 

daffodil names. London, 1958 
Royal Horticultural Society. The daffodil and tulip year book, 1960. 

London, 1959 
Royal Horticultural Society. The lily year book, 1960. London, 1959 
Royal Horticultural Society. The rhododendron and camellia year book, 

1960. London, 1959. 
Southern California Camellia Society. Camellia nomenclature; 7th rev. 

ed. by W. E. Woodroof. San Marino, Cal., 1960 
Street, Frederick. Azaleas. London, 1959 

Thomson, Richard. Old roses for modern gardens. New York, 1959 
Westcott, Cynthia. Anyone can grow roses; 3d ed. New York, 1960 
Whiting, J. R. How you can grow beautiful roses. New York, 1959 
Wright, R. C. M. and others. Roses. London, 1958 

Fruits, Vegetables and Herbs 

American Society for Horticultural Science. List of vegetable varieties 
introduced since 1936 in North America. East Lansing, Mich., 1959 
Carter, A. R. Dutch lights for growers and gardeners. London, 1956 
Genders, Roy. Fruit all the year round. London, 1954 
Gordon, Jean. Rose recipes, customs, facts, fancies. Woodstock, Vt, 1959 
Hartman, Henry. Catalog and evaluation of the pear collection at the 

Oregon Agricultural Experiment Station. Corvallis, 1957 
Matson, R. A. Gardening for gourmets.' New York, 1959 
Ware, G. W. & McCollum, J. P. Raising vegetables; rev. ed. Danville, 
111., 1959 

44 



Books Added to the Lebrary 

Webster, H. N. Herbs and how to grow them; rev. ed. Boston, 1959 

Wright, D. M. Dwarf fruit trees, their care and management. London, 

1953 

Wright, D. M. Dwarf pyramid fruit culture. London, 1959 

Nursery Management 

Oram, Bert. How to make money in the flower business. Fort Worth, 

Texas, 1958 
Plant buyer's guide; 6th ed.; Supplement no. 1. Boston, 1960 
Seed trade buyers guide, 1960. Chicago, 1960 

Conservation 

Camp Fire Girls, Inc. Conservation. New York, 19—? 

Fox, A. & Botter, G. E. Learning about soil and water conservation. 

Lincoln, Neb., 1958 
Hogner, D. C. Conservation in America. Philadelphia, 1958 
Hubbard, A. H. This land of ours. New York, 1960 

Garden Club and Flower Show Management 

Frederick, Mrs. V. B. & Merz, Mrs. W. T. Exhibitors and judges hand- 
book. Urbana, O., 1959 

Grumme, Marguerite. Basic principles of parliamentary law and protocol; 
2d ed. St. Louis, Mo., 1955 

Bobert, H. M. Parliamentary practice. New York, 1949 

Utter, E. C. Parliamentary law at a glance; rev. ed. Chicago, 1949 

Landscape Architecture 

Aul, H. B. How to plan modern home grounds. New York, 1959 

Brett, W. S. Planning your garden. London, 1957 

Brimer, John. Designs for outdoor living (building garden projects). 

New York, 1959 
Butler, G. D. Becreation areas; 2d ed. New York, 1958 
Cloud, K. M.-P. Evergreens for every state. Philadelphia, 1960 
Cox, E. H. M. & P. A. Modern shrubs. London, 1958. 
Hickok, P. B. Home gardens in Hawaii. Honolulu, 1958 
Hoyt, B. S. Check lists for ornamental plants of sub-tropical regions; 

new ed. San Diego, Cal., 1958 
Ortloff, H. S. & Baymore, H. B. The book of landscape design. New 

York, 1959 
Sunset Magazine. Sunset garden and patio building book. Menlo 

Park, Cal., 1960 

45 



Books Added to the Library 

Sunset Magazine. Sunset landscaping for modern living. Menlo Park, 

Cal., 1959 
Sunset Magazine. Swimming pools. Menlo Park, Cal., 1959 
Trovillion, V. & H. W. Sundial in our garden. Herrin, 111., 1955 

Gardens Around the World 

Beacon Hill Garden Club, Boston. Hidden gardens of Beacon Hill. 

Boston, 1959 
Colonial Williamsburg, Inc. Williamsburg in color. Williamsburg, Va., 

1959 
Cox, E. H. M. Plant hunting in China. London, 1945 
Darwin, Charles. The voyage of the Beagle; abridged by Millicent Sel- 

sam. New York, 1959 
Engel, D. H. Japanese gardens for today. Tokyo, 1959 
Garden Club of America. A photographic diary of the visit of the Club 

to Japan, May 13th to June 2nd, 1935 
Kew. Royal Gardens, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew (a guidebook) 3d 

ed. London, 1959 
Kieran, John. A natural history of New York City. Boston, 1959 
MacLeod, Dawn. Oasis of the North (Inverewe, Scotland). London, 

1958 
Peterson, E. L. Penn's Woods west. Pittsburgh, 1959 
Pratt, D. & R. Guide to early American homes— South. New York, 1956 
Roper, Lanning. The gardens in the Royal Park at Windsor. New York, 

1959 
Scotland's Gardens Scheme. Scotland's gardens, 1960. Edinburgh, 

1960 
Turrill, W. B. The Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. London, 1959 
Wyman, Donald. The arboretums and botanical gardens of North Amer- 
ica; new ed. Jamaica Plain, Mass., 1959 

Botany 

Akenhead, D. Horticulture in the British commonwealth. Farnham 

^ Royal, Eng., 1958 

Carleton, R. M. Index to common names of herbaceous plants. Boston, 
1959 

Coon, Nelson. Using wayside plants; 3d ed. New York, 1959 

Darwin, C. & Wallace, A. R. Evolution by natural selection. Cam- 
bridge, Eng., 1958 

Dodge, B. S. Plants that changed the world. Boston, 1959 

Eiseley, Loren. Darwin's century. New York, 1958 

Esau, Katherine. Anatomy of seed plants. New York, 1960 

Harrington, H. D. How to identify plants. Denver, Colo., 1957 

Jarvis, D. C. Folk medicine. New York, 1959 

46 



Books Added to the Library 

Linne, Carl von. Species plantarum; a fascimile of the first edition, 1753. 

London, 1957-59. 2 vols. 
Ott, John. My ivory cellar; 2d ed. Chicago, 1958 
Plant life; a Scientific American book. New York, 1957 
Piatt, Rutherford. 1001 questions answered about trees. New York, 

1959 
St. John, Harold. Nomenclature of plants. New York, 1958 
Singleton, W. R., ed. Nuclear radiation in food and agriculture. New 

York, 1958 
Uphof, J. C. T. Dictionary of economic plants. Weinheim, Germany, 

1959 
Veen, R. van der & Meijer, G. Light and plant growth. Eindhoven, 

Holland, 1960 

Monographs 

Backeberg, Curt. Die cactaceae, vol. 3. Jena, 1959 
Chase, Agnes. First book of grasses; 3d ed. Wash., D. C, 1959 
Conard, H. S. How to know the mosses and liverworts; rev. ed. Du- 
buque, 1959 
Hylander, Nils. The genus hosta in Swedish gardens. Uppsala, 1954 
Pilat, Albert. Mushrooms; 120 col. plates by Otto Usak. London. 

(Printed in Czechoslovakia), 195- 
Smith, L. B. The bromeliaceae of Brazil. Wash., D. C, 1955 
Withner, C. L., ed. The orchids, a scientific survey. New York, 1959 

Floras— North America 

Abrams, Leroy & Ferris, R. S. Illustrated flora of the Pacific states, 

vol. 4. Stanford, Cal., 1960 
Casey, Jewell. 101 American wild flowers. New York, 1959 
Core, E. L. & Ammons, N. P. Woody plants in winter. Pittsburgh, 

1958 
Garden Club of Amherst. Trees of Amherst. Amherst, Mass., 1959 
Grimm, W. C. Pocket field guide to trees. Harrisburg, Pa., 1958 
Harlow, W. M. Fruit key and twig key to trees and shrubs. New York, 

1959 
Howell, J. T., and others. A flora of San Francisco. San Francisco, 1958 
McKean, W. T., ed. Winter guide to native shrubs of the central Rocky 

Mountains. Denver, 1956 
Marshall, W. T. Introduction to desert plants. Phoenix, Ariz., 1959 
Moss, E. H. Flora of Alberta. Toronto, 1959 
Munz, P. A. & Keck, D. D. A California flora. Berkeley, 1959 
Patraw, P. M. Flowers of the southwest mesas. Palm Desert, Cal., 1959 
Strausbaugh, P. D. & Core, E. L. Flora of West Virginia, vol. 3. Mor- 
gan town, 1958 

47 



Books Added to the Library 

Viertel, A. T. Trees, shrubs and vines, a pictorial guide. Syracuse, 
1959 

Poetry and Essays 

Grigson, Geoffrey. A herbal of all sorts. New York, 1959 

Hay, Roy, comp. In praise of gardens. London, 1959 

Miller, M. B. A handful of flowers: poems. New York, 1959 

Moon, Owen. The daffodil, an anthology. Woodstock, Vt, 1949 

Robertson, Josephine. Meditations on garden themes. New York, 1959 

Tobe, J. H. Romance in the garden. Toronto, 1958 

Trovillion, Violet & H. W. The tussie mussies; 3d ed. Herrin, 111., 1955 

Flower Arrangement 

Amer, J. B. A picture book of prize-winning flower arrangements. 

Nashville, 1959 
Bebb, Dods. Japanese flower arrangement for the modern home. Lon- 
don, 1959 
Carr, R. E. Stepping stones to Japanese floral art; 6th ed. New York, 

1959 
Daughtridge, L. R. Little textbook of contemporary flower arranging. 

New York, 1959 
Easterby, E. G. The home book of flower arrangements. Phliadelphia, 

1960 
Hara, Seiko. Flowers around the clock. New York, 1959 
King, Isabel. Church flower arrangements. New York, 1960 
Kittel, M. B. Japanese flower arrangements for American homes. New 

York, 1960 
Kroh, Patricia. Design with flowers— unlimited. New York, 1959 
Li, H. L. Chinese flower arrangement; 2d ed. New York, 1959 
Louisiana Garden Club Federation. Louisiana arranges flowers. Frank- 
lin, 1959 
Mullins, R. E. Religious themes in flower arrangement. New York, 

1959 
Reusch, G. & Noble, M. Corsage craft; 2d ed. New York, 1960 
Riester, D. W. Design for flower arrangers. New York, 1959 
Rockwell, F. F. & Grayson, E. C. The Rockwells' new complete book of 

flower arrangement. New York, 1960 
Spry, Constance. Favourite flowers. London, 1959 

Biography 

Canada. Agricultural Dept. Plant Research Institute. A directory of 

botanists in Canada. Ottawa, 1959 
Dupree, A. H. Asa Gray, 1810-1888. Cambridge, Mass., 1959 
Wheatscroft, Harry. My life with roses. London, 1959 

48 



Children's Books Added to the Library 

Fletcher, H. J. Indoor gardens. Darien, Conn., 1959 

Frankel, L. & G. 101 best nature games and projects. New York, 1959 

Miner, F. M. Adventure book of growing plants. New York, 1959 

Selsam, M. E. Seeds and more seeds. New York, 1959 

Zion, Gene. The plant sitter. New York, 1959 

Gifts to the Library 

The Massachusetts Horticultural Society acknowledges with thanks gifts 
to the Library from the following donors: 

Batchelder, Mrs. George. L., Jr. 

Bradley, Richard. New improvements of planting and gardening; 

5th ed. 
Forster, T., ed. The perennial calendar; rev. ed. 
Loudon, J. C. The suburban gardener. 
M'Intosh, Charles. The book of the garden, v. 1-2. 

Chapman, Percival W. 

Meehan, Thomas. Native flowers and ferns of the United States, 
v. 1, pt. 1-7, 10 

Feinberg, Ida S. 

The Begonian, September 1954 to September 1956 

France, Mrs. Robert L. 

Trees of Amherst, by the Garden Club of Amherst, Mass. 

Harding, Madeleine. 

Singleton, Esther. The Shakespeare garden; 2d ed. 

Hunnewell, Walter. 

American Rhododendron Society. Yearbooks, 1945-1949. Quarterly 
bulletins, 1949-1959 

Moon, Mrs. Owen. 

Moon, Owen. The daffodil. 

Muller, Erhart. 

Pellett, F. C. Honey plants 

Nehrling, Arno H. 

Craig, J. & Beal, A. C. Sweet pea studies 

Paine, Mrs. Robert T., Jr. 

A directory of botanists in Canada. 

Roland, Robert H. 

A book of Japanese fruit and flower studies. 

Ross, Harold S. 

Broadside advertisement of an exhibit of the century plant, 188.S. 

49 



Gifts to the Library 

Sears, Mrs. Richard. 

Bailey, L. H. The apple tree 

Foxton, W. Shakespeare garden and wayside flowers 

Gardens old and new, vol. 1 

Jekyll, Gertrude. Annuals and perennials 

Jekyll, Gertrude. Colour schemes for the flower garden; 6th ed. 

King, Mrs. F. & Fothergill, J. The gardener's colour book 

Orcharding; rev. from the 5th ed. of the bulletin on apple growing 

Shelton, Louise. Beautiful gardens in America; rev. ed. 

Tipping, H. A. English gardens 

Snow, Samuel Peaslee. 

King, F. H. A text book of the physics of agriculture; 2d ed. 

Taylor, Mrs. Frank. 

Lithographs of American wild flowers, by Isaac Sprague 

Walker, Mrs. Ruth. 

Garden magazine, vol. 2 
Wilson, E. H. Aristocrats of the garden 
Wilson, E. H. China, mother of gardens 
Wilson, E. H. Plant hunting, vol. 2 

Waltham Field Station, Dr. John Havis, Head. 

Beach, S. A. The apples of New York, 2 vols. 

Maine. Agricultural Experiment Station. Report, 1902-1905, 1909- 

1912 
Massachusetts. Agricultural Board. Annual report, 1894-1895, 1897- 

1899, 1902-1905, 1907, 1909-1917 
Michigan. Agricultural Board. Report, 1906/7-1915/6 
Michigan. Geological and Biological Survey. Publication 6. 
New York (State) Agricultural Experiment Station, Geneva. Report, 

1908-1911 
Pennsylvania. Agricultural Dept. Report, 1907-1916 
Pennsylvania. State College. Report, 1900/01-1906/7, 1910/11 
U.S. Agricultural Department. Yearbook, 1900-1901, 1903, 1905-1923 
U.S. Agricultural Department. Experiment Stations Office. Annual re- 
port, 1908. 

. Report of work and expenditures, 1913 

U.S. Agricultural Department. Soils Bureau. Maps, 1911 

. Report of field activities, 1911 

Vermont. Agricultural Experiment Station. Annual report, 1903/4, 
1905/6, 1907/8-1908/9 
Wills, John B. 

Beautiful flowering trees and shrubs (in the garden of Mr. Wills) 

Yankee Bookstall. Women's Com. Children's Hospital Medical Cen- 
ter. 

Garden Club of America. A photographic diary of the visit of the 
Club to Japan, 1935. 

50 



HP* 



Benevolent Fraternity Fruit and Flower Mission 

jT^yp^HE fruit and Flower Mission has completed ninety-one years 
of continuous service to elderly people and to shut-ins in many sec- 
tions of Boston. The original thought and purpose of the founder 
has never been lost over this long period. Flowers are shared and dis- 
tributed in the crowded sections of Boston during the summer, bringing 
joy to those who need their message of cheer. Volunteer service has been 
the lifeline of the work and, dedicated people make possible the dis- 
tribution of baskets and trays at Thanksgiving, Christmas, and Easter 
by donations of food and dainties and checks to meet our needs. These 
baskets are real messengers of cheer. They give the elderly and the 
shut-in the knowledge that they are not forgotten. 

Eight flower shows at Horticultural Hall each year afford the dis- 
tribution of especially lovely flowers. This distribution starts in the 
spring and flowers are always appreciated by nursing homes, hospitals 
and such institutions, and by our recipients living in one-room homes. 
Fresh vegetables and fresh fruits remaining after two autumn shows 
give variety to meals in small nursing homes, institutions, and in homes of 
our elderly people who have cooking facilities. 

The summer flower distribution is one of the original patterns of this 
work. We have experienced some changes in transportation during the 
past few years. Last summer only four towns had railroad transportation 
privileges. This compares with 13 the previous summer. Many com- 
munities have been reluctant to discontinue the summer work and have 
sent checks to be used in the oflice during the summer and at holiday 
seasons. Others have sent by express and private car, and the town of 
Harvard has made deliveries by station wagon during the past two 
years. Flowers were received by express from Duxbury, Groton and 
North Andover; by private car from Winchester, Arlington, south- 
ern Brookline, Marblehead and Holbrook. Westboro, Hopkinton, 
Sharon, and Needham had rail service. All centers were supplied each 
week despite the loss of flowers from six towns. 

The Hamper Conference was held on October 26th. Forty at- 
tended. Chairmen from nine communities listened to reports from the 
following centers: North End Union, Bulfinch Place Chapel, Ja- 
maica Plain Neighborhood House, South End House, Ellis Memo- 
rial, and Robert Gould Shaw House. The total count for the season 
was eight hundred and fifty-four parcels. 

After the close of the summer work, attention is directed to the holiday 
basket work. This service brings real happiness and the assurance of not 
being "forgotten" to hundreds of lonely, elderly people and shut-ins each 
year at Thanksgiving, Christmas and Easter. Dedicated volunteers 
give many hours of work trimming baskets and wrapping food for weeks 
preceding these holidays. Nursing home patients receive attractive 
trays of fruit and dainties all assembled by one volunteer. Hundreds 
of homemade cookies are made by this volunteer. 

51 



Fruit and Flower Mission 

Volunteer service at the office is not the only contribution made at 
these holiday seasons. Contributions of food and checks were received 
from Garden Clubs, Alliances, Women's Clubs, Camp Fire Girls, and 
individuals. Lexington Morning Study Group sent their yearly contribution 
of twenty-five filled baskets at Christmas; Home Garden Club of Green- 
wood sent twelve filled trays at Thanksgiving and twelve at Easter; Junior 
League Garden Club sent twenty-five filled baskets at Easter; Needham 
Garden Club sent four cartons of food and several hundred homemade 
cookies. At Easter, one hundred twenty-five begonia plants were sent to 
shut-ins. We have sent baskets to two new centers this year, Margaret 
Fuller House in Cambridge and the Columbia Point Center in Dorchester. 

One of the most important aspects of our work is the Mission's interest 
in mental health for the past nine years. In Ward "N" of Boston 
State Hospital, sixty-nine women look forward each month to visits 
by the secretary and to the entertainment provided by a pianist and 
singer during the winter months. Participation in community singing 
and dancing by the patients shows a decided improvement each year. 
Special notice is given the holiday seasons with gifts and extra party 
refreshments. Summer outings by MTA bus have been made possible, 
in part, by a donation from the Eugene Fay Fund. Trips to the Public 
Gardens and the swan boats, Franklin Park, Castle Island, Middlesex 
Fells, and to the home of Mrs. Harold McKinney in Dedham gave 
many hours of relaxation and real pleasure to thirty-eight to forty pa- 
tients on six occasions this last year. The home visit was a real privi- 
lege since few had been in this atmosphere since their admittance to the 
hospital. We hope to take the patients again during the summer ahead 
to this delightful spot. 

Many cartons of clothing have been sent to this ward from the office, 
and the Thrift Shop of New England Hospital has contributed a 
large amount of clothing through this office. The hospital staff and the 
Massachusetts Association for Mental Health has recognized the work 
of the Mission as one of the best types of therapy for these patients. 

A visit by the secretary is one of the most appreciated services. Sixty 
visits have been made. This is the friendly link which brings the office 
and the recipient in closer understanding of the problems so real to our 
elderly friends. 

Our first acknowledgment is to the Massachusetts Horticultural So- 
ciety for the use of this office for 35 years, and to the exhibitors for the 
privilege of distributing the beauty of the flower shows to hundreds 
unable to enjoy this treat. 

To our volunteers who have given so freely of their time and patience, 
I wish to extend my sincere appreciation. Special mention should be 
made of the service given by Mrs. Pedersen of Dorchester and Miss 
Ada Wyman of Jamaica Plain who devoted from two to three days 
a week during all of the holiday seasons. For the tremendous task of pre- 

52 



Fruit and Flower Mission 

paring 235 trays for the nursing homes during the three holiday seasons, 
and for hundreds of homemade cookies donated through the year, a spe- 
cial mention should be given to Mrs. Ruby Thompson. 

Our contributors are also volunteers. Grateful appreciation is extended 
to all who have remembered our needs in any way during the year. Fi- 
nally, our yearly contributors who answer our appeal letters also deserve 
mention. It is the support of these interested volunteers who have enabled 
the Mission to survive and grow. To all of these friends of Fruit and 
Flower Mission I extend my sincere and earnest thanks. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Esther L. Camfield, 
Executive Secretary 




Colorful Tulip display staged by Breck's of Boston, at the 1960 Tulip Show 

53 



Honorary Members 

1942 F. A. Bartlett, Stamford, Connecticut 

1942 Dr. William A. Dayton, Washington, D. C. 

1942 Joseph B. Garle, Stewartstown, Pennsylvania 

1942 Rorert Moses, New York, New York 

1942 G. G. Nearing, Ridgewood, New Jersey 

1942 Mrs. Elizareth Peterson, Scarsdale, New York 

1942 George H. Pring, St. Louis, Missouri 

1942 Norman Taylor, New York, New York 

1942 C. J. Van Bourgondien, Babylon, Long Island, New York 

1942 Richard Wellington, Geneva, New York 

1943 Alrert C. Burrage, Ipswich, Massachusetts 
1943 Vincent DePetris, Grosse Farms, Michigan 

1943 Henry T. Skinner, Washington, D. C. 

1944 Wilfrid Wheeler, Hatchville, Falmouth, Massachusetts 

1944 Richardson Wright, Chatham, Massachusetts 

1945 Alrert Hulley, Middleboro, Massachusetts 

1946 Walter B. Clark, San Jose, California 

1946 Mrs. John H. Cunningham, Brookline, Massachusetts 

1946 Daniel W. O'Brien, Boston, Massachusetts 

1946 Edmund F. Palmer, Vineland Station, Ontario, Canada 

1947 Thomas H. Everett, New York Botanical Garden, New York 
1947 James J. Hurley, Newton Highlands, Massachusetts 

1947 Isarella Preston, Lancaster, England 

1948 Stedman Buttrick, Concord, Massachusetts 
1948 Ernest F. Coe, Coconut Grove, Florida 

1948 Eric Walther, San Francisco, California 

1949 Morris Carter, Boston, Massachusetts 
1949 Henry Kohankie, Painesville, Ohio 

1949 A. Kenneth Simpson, Tarrytown, New York 

1949 Harold B. Tukey, East Lansing, Michigan 

1950 Montague Free, Hyde Park, New York 
1950 Dr. Wilson Popenoe, Antigua, Guatemala 

1950 George L. Slate, Geneva, New York 

1951 William Hertrich, San Marino, California 
1951 Dr. Samuel L. Emsweller, Beltsville, Maryland 
1951 Jan de Graaff, Gresham, Oregon 

1951 Thomas C. Desmond, Newburgh, New York 

1951 Mrs. G. Kennard Wakefield, Milton, Massachusetts 

1952 Sir William Wright Smith, Edinburgh, Scotland 
1952 Dr. Walter E. Lammerts, Livermore, California 
1952 Prof. Alex Laurie, Eustis, Florida 

1952 Dr. Donald Forsha Jones, New Haven, Connecticut 

1953 Dr. Alrert Francis Blakeslee, Northampton, Massachusetts 
1953 Arie F. den Boer, Des Moines, Iowa 

1953 Dr. Victor A. Tiedjens, Marion, Ohio 

1953 Fred Edmunds, Portland, Oregon 

1954 Arnold Davis, Cleveland, Ohio 

1954 Joseph Lane, New York, New York 

1955 Dr. Richard P. White, Washington, D. C. 

1955 Paul Vossberg, Westbury, Long Island, New York 

1 955 Mrs. Irving C. Wright, Milton, Massachusetts 

54 



Honorary Members 

1955 Miss Sarah E. Brassill, Weymouth, Massachusetts 

1956 Eugene S. Boerner, Newark, New York 
1956 Frank Reinelt, Capitola, California 

1956 Mrs. Arthur P. Teele, Boston, Massachusetts 

1957 W. Ray Hastings, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 
1957 Dr. R. E. Kleinsorge, Silverton, Oregon 
1957 Jacques Legendre, Wachapreague, Virginia 

1957 Charles H. Perkins, Newark, New York 

1958 Mrs. Lucien B. Taylor, Dover, Massachusetts 
1958 Mrs. Roy Arthur Hunt, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

1958 J. J. Grullemans, Mentor, Ohio 

1959 Prof. L. C. Chadwick, Columbus, Ohio 

1959 Mrs. Susan Delano McKelvey, Boston, Massachusetts 

1959 Arno H. Nehrling, Needham, Massachusetts 

1959 Conrad L. Wirth, Washington, D. C. 

1960 Dr. H. Harold Hume, Gainesville, Florida 
1960 Henry Teuscher, Montreal, Canada 

1960 Dr. Karl Sax, Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts 

1960 George W. Peyton, Rapidan, Virginia 

1960 Henry G. Wendler, Allston, Massachusetts 




Rock Garden, staged by Alexander Heimlich, at the 1960 Spring Show 
Awarded two Gold Medals, one from the Pennsylvania Horticultural So- 
ciety and the other, from the Massachusetts Horticultural Society 



55 



Necrology 



A list of the members of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, whose 
deaths were reported to the Membership Secretary, during the year. 



Mr. Henry Saxton Adams 

Mrs. Maximilian Agassiz 

Mr. John S. Ames 

Miss Elizareth M. Atwill 

Mr. Nelson S. Bartlett 

Mr. J. L. S. Barton 

Mrs. Boylston Beal 

Mrs. Sherman C. Bishel 

Mr. Benjamin S. Blake 

Mrs. William C. Blois 

Mrs. Elrridge Bollong 

Miss Ellen Bullard 

Mr. Chester Thayer Burr 

Mrs. George W. Butterworth - 

Mr. John Carlson 

Mrs. Hurert L. Carter 

Mr. Joseph H. Caughey 

Mr. Joseph E. Chaplain 

Mr. Lawrence W. Churchill 

Mr. Michael Convey 

Miss Louise M. Cottle 

Mrs. Helen Cummings 

Mrs. Maurice J. Curran 

Mr. Herman G. Curtis 

Mr. Frederick W. Damon 

Mrs. Joseph DeLuca 

Mr. Ronald C. Fiske 

Mr. Frederick C. Fletcher . 

Mr. Stephen L. French 

Gertrude F. Frisrie, M.D. 

Mr. James T. Gormley 

Mrs. George E. Green 

Miss Louise D. Haartz 

Miss Mary E. Harwood 

Mr. Edward W. Higgins 

Miss Jean G. Hinkle 

Mr. Roger F. Hooper 

Mrs. Malcolm Howell 

Mr. Charles E. Hulce 

Miss Annie H. Jackson 

Mr. Horace C. Jenkins 

Mrs. Ira M. Jones 

Mr. Frank E. Keniston 

Mrs. Carlton L. Kennedy 

Mr. Oscar B. Kenrick 

Miss Helen Kirry 

Mrs. F. M. Knott 

Mr. Errol H. Locke 

Miss Marjorie C. Loring 

Mr. David W. Mann 

Mr. Donald D. 



Mr. Frank I. Manter 
Mr. Charles Miller 
Miss Doris B. Moroow 
Miss Mary G. Morrissey 
Mr. J. Lothrop Motley 
Mrs. Robert C. Munroe 
Mrs. James A. Nagle 
Mr. Wilfred Neal 
Miss Esther Nelson 
Mr. Frederick B. Nelson 
Mrs. C. E. O'Brien 
Mrs. Olaf Olsen 
Frederic H. Packard, M.D. 
Mr. Roland K. Parker 
Mrs. Edmund R. Parry 
Mrs. James E. Patton 
Mrs. Samuel C. Payson 
Mrs. Roger Pierce Jr. 
Mr. Bremer W. Pond 
Mrs. George N. Proctor 
Miss Louisa Putnam 
Mrs. Arthur F. Ramseyer 
Mrs. George D. Richmond 
Miss Lillian D. Rider 
Mr. John Rorertson 
Mrs. Hay ward Rolfe 
Mr. Warren S. Rowland 
Dr. John T. Ryan 
Mr. John L. Saltonstall 
Mrs. Nathaniel S. Simpkins, Jr. 
Miss Ethel L. Squire 
Dr. A. Warren Stearns 
Mr. Albert Stone, Jr. 
Mr. Warren S. Swett 
Mrs. Charles W. Taintor 
Mrs. Homer C. Taylor 
Miss Lillian Trussell 
Mr. Richard G. Turner 
Miss Helen M. Tyler 
Mr. P. J. VanBaarda 
Mr. Eliot Wadsworth 
Mr. Channing Wells 
Mrs. Arthur F. Wheat 
Mr. Harry A. Wheeler 
Dr. Lemoyne White 
Mrs. Edith E. Whittemore 
Mrs. Katharine S. Wilkins 
Mr. Henry M. Williams 
Mr. William H. Williamson 
Mrs. Fred A. Wilson 
Wyman 



Some Important Thoughts on Bequests to the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

Consistently rising costs for activities and maintenance have made the 
Society more dependent on the generosity of its members if it is to 
contribute to the ever increasing development of horticultural influence 
and achievement throughout the country. 

Although the Society enjoys an enviable reputation for its sound 
financial condition and its judicious method of handling investments, the 
income from Endowment Funds no longer provides the comfortable 
economic cushion existing several years ago. 

Therefore, it is hoped the Massachusetts Horticultural Society will be 
remembered by those individuals who wish to distribute their funds for 
public benefaction in the field of arts and sciences. 

A convenient form of Bequest appears below for those who agree the 
Society should carry on and extend its services "for the advancement of 
horticulture." 



Form of Bequest 

I give and bequeath to the Massachusetts Horticultural 
Society located in Boston, Massachusetts, the sum of 

to be used as the Board of Trustees 

may direct for the promotion of horticulture in its various 
forms and for extending the activities of the Society along 
educational lines. 

Signed 



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